Glass House Mountains National Park Sunshine Coast | Brisbane

Photo credit: Maxime Coquard © Tourism and Events Queensland

Purchase a Ranger field guide

Discover more about the park’s plants by purchasing a copy of the ‘Ranger field guide: Native plants of Glass House Mountains National Park’. They can be purchased over the phone or by visiting a sales outlet.

Things to do

    Fig tree, Mount Beerburrum walking track. Rainforest and open forest feature on this walk. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    Fig tree, Mount Beerburrum walking track. Rainforest and open forest feature on this walk. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    View of Coonowrin and Beerwah from the summit of Ngungun. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    View of Coonowrin and Beerwah from the summit of Ngungun. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    Montane heath grows around the Ngungun summit. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    Montane heath grows around the Ngungun summit. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    Expect challenging and rocky uphill sections on the Yul-yan-man track. Photo: Kate McGuiness, Queensland Government.

    Expect challenging and rocky uphill sections on the Yul-yan-man track. Photo: Kate McGuiness, Queensland Government.

    Mountain bike riders on the Soldier Settlers section of the shared trail between Beerburrum trailhead and Tibrogargan trailhead. Photo: Robert Ashdown, Queensland Government.

    Mountain bike riders on the Soldier Settlers section of the shared trail between Beerburrum trailhead and Tibrogargan trailhead. Photo: Robert Ashdown, Queensland Government.

    Camping and accommodation

    Camping

    There are no camping areas within Glass House Mountains National Park.

    Nearby Beerwah State Forest has a camping area at Coochin Creek.

    There are also private camping areas on the Glass House Mountains Road—see the tourism information links for further information.

    Other accommodation

    A range of holiday accommodation is available in the Sunshine Coast hinterland. For more information see the tourism information links.

    Glass House Mountains National Park offers many opportunities for the visitor to explore and enjoy the natural surrounds:

    Walks

    Find out more information on walking in the Glass House Mountains.

    Day-use areas

    There are picnic tables and toilets at Tibrogargan trailhead (beside the car park) and Beerwah trailhead (a short 100m walk from the car park).

    Wheelchair accessible toilets and some picnic tables are provided at Tibrogargan trailhead. The access surface is gravel and grass.

    Day-use areas are also provided nearby in Beerburrum West State Forest (Glass House Mountains lookout day-use area) and Beerwah State Forest (Coochin Creek day-use area). Facilities at both locations include picnic tables, wheelchair-accessible toilets and gas barbecues. At Glass House Mountains lookout there are spectacular viewpoints over Glass House Mountains National Park and a short walk.

    Roped sports—abseiling and rockclimbing

    • Rockclimbing and abseiling opportunities are suitable for experienced and well equipped climbers only.
    • Take care to avoid dislodging rocks as they might hit climbers below you—even small rocks can cause serious injury.
    • Never attempt climbs in wet weather as smooth surfaces can be slippery and dangerous. The likelihood of rockfalls and landslides are heightened by rainfall and intense fire activity. Flexible soled shoes with good grip should be worn.
    • Consider visiting with a tour guide or club, especially if you are new to this area.

    Locations for roped sports:

    • Mount Ngungun (253m)

      This mountain provides opportunities for moderately challenging rock face climbing and abseiling for 20m to 40m roped sports. Equipment and expertise are essential.
    • Mount Tibrogargan (364m)

      A challenging and potentially dangerous rock face climbing site that requires a high level of expertise and equipment. There is a risk that severe injury or even death could result from accidents whilst climbing Mount Tibrogargan. If you do not have the required fitness or experience and/or are not willing to assume the risk—do not attempt to climb the mountain.
    • Mount Beerwah (556m)

      This mountain provides opportunities for challenging and potentially dangerous rock face climbing. A high level of expertise and equipment is required. There is a risk that severe injury or even death could result from accidents whilst climbing Mount Beerwah. If you do not have the required fitness or experience and/or are not willing to assume the risk—do not attempt to climb the mountain.

    Your safety is our concern but your responsibility.

    • Never attempt to climb or abseil any mountain unless you are confident you can complete the activity.
    • Always use appropriate equipment. Helmets are strongly recommended.
    • Allow enough time to complete your climb in daylight hours.
    • Carry enough water and food for your climb.
    • Carry a mobile phone and keep emergency phone numbers.
    • Never climb alone.
    • Be aware of those below—be careful not to dislodge rocks when climbing.
    • Watch the weather—if it looks like it will rain, do not attempt the climb. Rocks will become slippery and dangerous.
    • Carry a first-aid kit.

    For more information on roped sports in this region visit Australian Climbing Association (QLD).

    • There are currently no park alerts for this park.