David Fleay Wildlife Park Gold Coast

4.5

Google reviews (514 total)

Google reviews for David Fleay Wildlife Park

4.5 Write a review

  • 5 pam denman
    in the last week

    Lovely intimate zoo. I'd never seen a Brolga up so close before. Very good keeper talks.

  • 5 AP10 drone pics
    a month ago

    Small wildlife park , if your holidaying with older family , grandparents etc. Nice easy walk all flat. Also if you call they will tell you were the handicap parking is. Made it much easier for my grandfather

  • 5 kas kas
    a month ago

    A small wildlife park. Great for the little ones. Was quiet but enjoyed wandering around at our own pace. Good bird show. Got to see an eagle so that was good.

  • 3 Steffy S
    a month ago

    Very quiet park, we were probably 10 visitors in the whole park the day I visited, good if you don't like crowd. I found myself bored quite quickly. Happy with the animals I saw but wouldn't go back. Props to the staff though, absolutely lovely and very informative.

  • 5 Nel
    5 months ago

    Great, knowledgeable staff. We loved the walk around the wildlife park. Wheelchair accessible and great gentle stroll. We were able to see the bird show and the crocodile feeding, as well as had a chance to talk to the keepers around the park as they were interacting with the animals. Learned for the first time that Saltwater crocodiles live everywhere and not just in salt water, and about the endangered species that were living in the park. The birds and some of the wallabies are free to wander in and out of the park and the nature reserve (including the mangrove walk) so it is definitely worth taking a walk along the walking trails in and around the park

  • More info and reviews

School holiday activities at the Gateway Visitor Centres

Join our Park Rangers at Walkabout Creek Discovery Centre and David Fleay Wildlife Park to ‘go wild’ and connect with nature these school holidays. With loads of fun activities on offer, there’s something for everyone!

Park open 9am to 4pm, seven days a week

Our wildlife and Park Rangers look forward to welcoming you to the park. As part of our COVID-safe plan, we have implemented some changes—please ensure you review all information before you visit.

Virtual tour—MyRanger app

Discover the beauty and diversity of David Fleay Wildlife Park through the virtual ranger guided tours. Get up close and personal with some of the park’s unique animals through the Augmented Reality experiences. It’s like having a personal ranger in the palm of your hand.

Join the Park Rangers at David Fleay Wildlife Park to learn more about Queensland’s unique wildlife! Photo credit: Maxime Coquard © Queensland Government

Spotlight on Wally

Wally the platypus
Wally the platypus

Photo credit: Wade Gilbert, Queensland Government

Wally the platpus being weighed in a basket on a scale.
Wally being weighed during his weekly check-up at David Fleay Wildlife Park.

Photo credit: Jacqui Seal, Queensland Government

Photo credit: Nikki Sparks, Queensland Government

The David Fleay Wildlife Park is now home to a young male platypus called Wally. In January 2014, a member of the public found Wally injured and underweight—now in his new home he is growing stronger everyday.

Wally's story

Wally was found injured and underweight by a member of the public near Mount Warning in northern New South Wales back in January. Weighing in at less than 200 grams, he needed some intensive care from our rangers in the form of four-hourly feeds of crayfish, insects and worms. Now he weighs over 700 grams, but he will never grow strong enough to be released back into the wild. Wally’s new home is the park’s nocturnal house.

The legacy of Dr David Fleay is being carried on because Wally is part of the wide range of educational programs offered by David Fleay Wildlife Park that encourages community awareness and appreciation of our native wildlife.

He looks cuddly now but rangers caring for Wally won’t be getting too many cuddles in the future. Wally is a male platypus, which means as gets older the venomous spurs on his hind legs will develop as he matures. While the venom hasn’t caused any known human fatalities, people who have been spurred reported prolonged periods of extreme pain. That is why Wally is being handled less and why it is a good reason never to pick up a platypus in the wild!

Wally won’t be spending all of his time in the nocturnal display tank. Once he has eaten his fill, he is free to venture out of the water and behind the display tank into a specially designed burrow system with grass-lined nesting chambers to rest. So, if at first you can’t spot him, make sure you come back a little later to see if he is up and about.

Learn more about platypus.