Daisy Hill Conservation Park Brisbane

Daisy Hill Koala Bushland

The Queensland Government is developing the next stage of projects as part of its long-term plan to improve the management, use and enjoyment of the Daisy Hill Koala Bushland area. Photo credit: © Queensland Government

Photo credit: Anna Osetroff © Queensland Government

Firebreak upgrades in protected areas south of Brisbane

Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service and Partnerships has recently completed works to upgrade firebreaks along a number of boundaries in Daisy Hill Conservation Park and other protected areas south of Brisbane.

Be inspired: 5 reasons to take the whole family to Daisy Hill for a great day out!

Think of Daisy Hill and koalas come to mind! At Daisy Hill you can get up close to koalas and learn more about their conservation, as well as spot for them amongst the gum trees. Photo credit: Anna Osetroff © Queensland Government

Be inspired: 8 family-friendly walks around the Gold Coast

Calling nature enthusiasts of all ages! If you’re looking for nature therapy the whole family can enjoy, there’s no better place than Queensland’s biggest playground—Queensland National Parks! Photo credit: Anna Osetroff © Queensland Government

Be inspired: Top 5 mountain biking parks in south east Queensland

Southeast Queensland is jam-packed with an incredible variety of national parks, state forests and conservation parks, some right on Brisbane’s doorstep! Photo credit: © Queensland Government

Journeys

    Two female walkers on Buhot Creek circuit.

    Daisy Hill has single-use walking trails and a network of shared trails for walkers to enjoy.

    Photo credit: Lise Pedersen

    Photo of Paperbark trail boardwalk

    Follow the Paperbark trail boardwalk as it winds through cool melaleuca wetlands.

    Photo credit: © Mark Patenaude, Queensland Government

    Walking

    Daisy Hill Conservation Park offers the chance to explore tall eucalypt forests, melaleuca wetlands and the billabongs along Buhot Creek.

    There are two designated single-use walking trails in the park. The 450m Paperbark trail is suitable for wheelchairs and families with strollers and features a boardwalk. Walking is also permitted on all management roads and shared trails in Daisy Hill Conservation Park and the greater Koala Bushland Coordinated Conservation Area (KBCCA), unless otherwise signed.

    Visitors can enjoy bushwalking with their dogs on shared trails only (dogs are not permitted on the mountain-bike only trails). Dogs must be kept on a leash at all times.

    Walking trails (mountain bikes and horses prohibited)
    TrailClassificationDistanceTimeDescription
    Paperbark trail

    Grade 1

    450m Allow 15min

    Suitable for wheelchairs, this Disability Discrimination Act compliant trail and boardwalk starts near car park three in the Daisy Hill day-use area. It winds through cool melaleuca wetlands fed by a natural spring. Stop to read the interpretive signs along the way to find out why melaleucas are marvellous!

    Take a virtual tour of the Paperbark trail captured with Google Street View Trekker.

    Tree discovery trail

    Grade 2

    800m Allow 30min Eucalypts are extraordinary! Find out why on this self-guided trail that starts near car park four in the Daisy Hill day-use area and winds through open eucalypt forest.

    See the shared trails table below for other walking options.

    Mountain-bike riding and horseriding

    Enjoy horseriding along any of the shared trails.

    Enjoy horseriding along any of the shared trails.

    Photo credit: Monique Shepherd, Queensland Government

    Ride along one of the designated mountain-bike or shared trails.

    Ride along one of the designated mountain-bike or shared trails.

    Photo credit: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government

    For those looking for two-wheeled adventure, Daisy Hill and the greater KBCCA has kilometres of premier recreational trails. The mountain-bike only trails are built to international standards, offering a good mix of levels for all riders. Explore hillsides of eucalypt forest on an easy, early morning ride or challenge yourself with berms on tight corners and rock features. The KBCCA’s shared trails are wider and easier to ride.

    Horseriders can also explore the natural surrounds of the KBCCA on the network of shared recreational trails. These well-maintained trails cater for riders of easy to moderate experience, with rides ranging from a few hundred metres to many kilometres if you combine trails. Enjoy a relaxed, meandering ride through the area’s magnificent bushland, keeping an eye out for snoozing koalas in the branches above. Settle into the saddle with nothing but you, your horse and the wildlife around you.

    Mountain-bike riding and horseriding are permitted on all management roads and most shared trails in Daisy Hill Conservation Park and the greater KBCCA, unless otherwise signed. Each trail entry has a sign indicating which recreational activities are permitted.

    Permits are not required for horseriding or mountain-bike riding in Daisy Hill Conservation Park.

    Mountain-bike only trails in the KBCCA (horses, walkers and dogs prohibited)
    TrailClassificationDistanceTimeDescription
    1. Possum Box trailIntermediate 2.2km Allow 10mins Best ridden from the five ways junction, but can be ridden in both directions.
    2. Chipline trailIntermediate 680m Allow 5mins Can be ridden both directions but is a downhill run from the five ways junction. There is a challenging rock garden 200m in from the top of the trail.
    3. Lace monitor trailIntermediate 2.5km Allow 10mins Can be ridden in both directions, preferred direction of travel is east to west. A sweeping trail with technical features.
    9. Jim Finch trailIntermediate 565m Allow 5mins A short trail link from the southern boundary.
    11. Gillians trailIntermediate 530m Allow 5mins A short trail link from the Glossy black trail to the Ripleys and Gilder shared-use trails.
    12. Glossy black trailEasy 690m one way Allow 5 to 10min Can be ridden in both directions. A short trail that links two sections of the Stringybark trail, avoiding a steep section of the trail.
    14. Jumping ant trailIntermediate 1.4km Allow 7mins Best ridden from the five ways junction, but can be ridden in both directions.
    Shared trails in the KBCCA (walkers, horseriders and mountain-bike riders permitted)
    Trail ClassificationDistanceTimeDescription
    Buhot Creek circuit

    Grade 3

    Intermediate

    Intermediate

    9km Allow 5.5hrs to walk or 2hrs to ride This trail starts from the Daisy Hill trail hub and allows visitors to explore Daisy Hill Conservation Park and adjoining Neville Lawrie Reserve. Take time by tranquil waterholes and enjoy views from the old quarry.
    Plunkett mallee circuit

    Grade 2

    Intermediate

    Easy

    2.54km Allow 30mins to walk or 15mins to ride This circuit features a stand of Plunkett mallee Eucalyptus curtisii, a near threatened tree within the Redland City Council area that flowers prolifically from September to November.
    Spotted gum circuit

    Grade 3

    Intermediate

    Easy

    5.2km Allow 2.5hrs to walk or 50mins to ride Branching off the Buhot Creek circuit, this circuit trail follows a gently undulating ridgeline through eucalypt forest dominated by spotted gums.
    Stringybark circuit

    Grade 3

    Intermediate

    Intermediate

    5.7km Allow 3.5hrs to walk or 1hr to ride This trail starts from the Daisy Hill trail hub and meanders through the various plant communities within the Buhot Creek catchment. Red-necked wallabies, swamp wallabies and various birds may be seen along the way.
    4. Ripleys trail

    Grade 3

    Intermediate

    Intermediate

    2.2km Allow 30 to 40min to walk or 15mins to ride This trail climbs to an elevated ridge with numerous downhill opportunities.
    5. Koala trail

    Grade 3

    Intermediate

    Intermediate

    1.1km Allow 15mins to walk or 5mins to ride This trail is an extension of the Chipline trail (2).
    10. Glider trail

    Grade 3

    Intermediate

    Intermediate

    2.3km Allow 30 to 40mins to walk or 15mins to ride The Glider trail branches off the Buhot Creek circuit in Neville Lawrie Reserve and offers mountain-bike riders an extension to Gillians trail.
    13. Sleepy hollow trail

    Grade 3

    Intermediate

    Intermediate

    350m Allow 5mins to walk or 2mins to ride Very short trail branching off the Buhot Creek circuit into Don and Christine Burnett Conservation Area.
    Walking and mountain biking shared trails in the KBCCA (horseriders prohibited)
    TrailClassificationDistanceTimeDescription
    6. Wiry panic trail

    Grade 3

    Intermediate

    1.6km Allow 40mins to walk or 10mins to ride Best ridden from north to south to make the most of the downhill run.
    7. Grasstree East trail

    Grade 3

    Intermediate

    860m Allow 20mins to walk or 7mins to ride Grasstree East trail is a linking trail between sections of the Plunkett Mallee circuit in Neville Lawrie Reserve and Don and Christine Burnett Conservation Area.
    15. Grasstree West trail

    Grade 3

    Intermediate

    830m Allow 20mins to walk or 7mins to ride Grasstree Wast trail is a linking trail between sections of the Plunkett Mallee circuit in Don and Christine Burnett Conservation Area.
    8. Nirvana trail

    Grade 4

    Difficult

    1.9km one way Allow 1hr to walk or 25mins to ride To get the best of this trail ride from east to west.

    Ride safely

    We want you to get the best out of your ride.

    • Always wear a helmet.
    • Plan ahead, ride within your ability and according to trail conditions.
    • Slow down or stop when approaching other trail users. Follow the give-way code.
    • Slow down when riding over water bars (whoa-boys) on shared trails—excess speed can cause loss of control and may result in injury.
    • Avoid riding in large groups—keep groups to fewer than 12.
    • Avoid skidding and sliding around turns—this causes trail damage and may result in a collision with other trail users.
    • Avoid riding during and after rain when tracks are soft, wet and muddy.
    • Stay on marked trails—riding over vegetation, taking shortcuts and forming new trails damages plants and wildlife habitat.
    • Respect areas closed to riding.

    Give way signFollow the give-way code

    • Cyclists must give way to walkers and horseriders, and alert others when approaching them.
    • Walkers must give way to horses.