Woowoonga National Park Bundaberg

View of Woowoonga National Park. Photo Brian Tighe, Queensland Government.

Things to do

    North Burnett Regional Council provides the Woowoonga picnic area adjacent to the start of the hiking track. Photo Brian Tighe, Queensland Government.

    North Burnett Regional Council provides the Woowoonga picnic area adjacent to the start of the hiking track. Photo Brian Tighe, Queensland Government.

    Vulnerable black-breasted button quail make their home amongst the remnant dry rainforest and vine thickets. Photo Mark Sanders, EcoSmart Ecology.

    Vulnerable black-breasted button quail make their home amongst the remnant dry rainforest and vine thickets. Photo Mark Sanders, EcoSmart Ecology.

    Hike to the summit to enjoy expansive views. Photo Brian Tighe, Queensland Government.

    Hike to the summit to enjoy expansive views. Photo Brian Tighe, Queensland Government.

    Grass trees grow near the summit. Photo Brian Tighe, Queensland Government.

    Grass trees grow near the summit. Photo Brian Tighe, Queensland Government.

    Experience nature in this peaceful retreat by exploring the forest along the hiking track. There are lots of plants, birds and other wildlife to discover, including red-tailed black cockatoos in summer.

    Fit, experienced bushwalkers with navigation skills can complete the whole hiking track that leads hikers to the summit in the heart of Woowoonga National Park. From the summit there are spectacular views over the emerald forest canopy to Maryborough in the distance.

    The national park entrance is located beside the North Burnett Regional Council’s Woowoonga picnic area. Council facilities include a sheltered picnic table and tank water (treat before drinking).

    Camping and accommodation

    Camping

    There are no camping areas within Woowoonga National Park and bush camping is not allowed.

    Other accommodation

    The nearest accommodation options are in Biggenden—a motel, a few hotels and caravan park.

    For more information see the tourism information links.

    Walking

    grade 4 walking trackMount Woowoonga hiking track (Grade 4)

    Mount Woowoonga is a challenging landscape. This hike is only recommended for fit and experienced hikers with bush navigation and emergency first aid skills.

    Hikers need to be self-reliant—make sure you are suitably equipped and prepared for this hike.

    grade 4 walking trackGrade 4 walking track classification:

    • Bushwalking experience recommended.
    • Tracks may be long, rough and very steep.
    • Directional signs may be limited.

    Total distance: 3.6km return
    Total time: Allow 4hr return (walking time)

    The hiking track information is provided in two sections—the first section is easier than the second section.

    Track section 1: 1.6km return; Allow 1hr return. From the start of the walk to the second forest seat.

    Leaving near the picnic area this track weaves through thick vine forest where tracks from wallabies, bandicoots and brush-turkeys may be seen. Take a break on the seat amongst the peaceful sounds of the mountain.

    Turn back at this point if you are having any difficulty. The track from here to the summit is a continuous, steep climb.

    Track section 2: Beyond the second seat, the track leads another 1km to the summit—it is a continuous, steep climb that requires a high level of fitness (allow 3hr return to complete section 2).

    The track climbs steeply through hoop pine rainforest. Look for cycads towards the summit before the forest opens up with New England blackbutt (Eucalyptus andrewsii ssp. Cam panulata), uncommon in this region, standing among granite boulders at the peak.

    From the summit, views to the east reveal the Seaview Range to Maryborough and, on a clear day, Fraser Island. Biggenden can be seen to the south-west and Childers to the north-east. The massive granite outcrop of Mount Walsh is visible as you descend.

    Caution:

    • The summit has vertical cliff edges. Take care near cliff edges—they can be deceptive and are often closer than you think.
    • Begin your hike early to avoid the hotter parts of the day and return in daylight hours.
    • Avoid walking during wet weather. The summit has steep ridges and rocks can become slippery.
    • Cloud and mist conditions can make visibility poor. If this occurs wait until it clears before continuing your hike.
    • Always check the weather forecast before you go.

    For more general safety information, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

    • There are currently no park alerts for this park.