Woondum National Park Sunshine Coast

Photo credit: ©Qld Govt

Things to do

    Turpentine trees feature on the short Turpentine circuit walk. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    Turpentine trees feature on the short Turpentine circuit walk. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    Turpentine Syncarpia glomulifera flowers. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    Turpentine Syncarpia glomulifera flowers. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    Flatstem wattle Accacia complanata can often be seen flowering beside the forest road in summer and autumn. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    Flatstem wattle Accacia complanata can often be seen flowering beside the forest road in summer and autumn. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    From the day-use area, the forest road has steep grades, narrow sections and creek crossings. It is suitable for four-wheel-drives and motorbikes. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    From the day-use area, the forest road has steep grades, narrow sections and creek crossings. It is suitable for four-wheel-drives and motorbikes. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    Tree heath Trochocarpa laurina grows beside the rock pools. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    Tree heath Trochocarpa laurina grows beside the rock pools. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    Woondum National Park offers many nature-based opportunities for the visitor to explore and enjoy the natural surrounds.

    Camping and accommodation

    Camping

    There are no camping areas within Woondum National Park. Nearby Amamoor State Forest, Cooloola Recreation Area, Great Sandy National Park and Brooyar State Forest offer camping opportunities.

    Other accommodation

    There is a range of holiday accommodation in and around Gympie.

    There are several privately run campgrounds, guesthouse, lodges and bed and breakfasts within a short distance of Woondum National Park.

    For more information see the tourism information links.

    Walking

    Key to track standards

    The classification system is based on Australian Standards. Please note that while each track is classified according to its most difficult section, other sections may be of an easier level.

    Choose walks that suit your fitness levels.

    Grade 3 track

    • Suitable for most ages and fitness levels..
    • Some bushwalking experience recommended.
    • Formed tracks, with junctions signposted.
    • Tracks may have short steep hill sections, a rough surface and many steps.

    Grade 5 track

    • Very experienced bushwalkers with specialised skills, including navigation and emergency first aid.
    • Unformed tracks, with no directional signs.
    • Tracks are likely to be very rough and very steep.

    Turpentine circuit (Grade 3)

    Distance: 500m return
    Time: Allow about 20mins walking time

    Details: Large turpentine trees Syncarpia glomulifera feature on this short walk through tall open forest and rainforest. The walk includes a rock hop across Boulder Creek.

    Boulder Mountain hiking trail (Grade 5)

    Distance: 3.2km return
    Time: Allow 2hrs walking time

    Details: Walk through tall open forest with a rainforest understory and open forest with grass trees to the summit of Boulder Mountain. Extremely steep, uphill sections make this walk suitable for very fit people only.

    Driving

    Four-wheel-drive and motorbike access only.

    Registered four-wheel-drive vehicles and motorbikes may be driven on roads in these forests. The driver must hold a valid licence to operate the vehicle.

    The forest road has steep grades, narrow sections and creek crossings. Large drainage humps run diagonally across steep section of the road, making it unsuitable for vehicles with low clearance.

    Tall open forest, wet sclerophyll forest and rainforest line the road and create the perfect setting for a forest drive.

    The Noosa Trail Network for horse riders, mountain bike riders and bushwalkers follows parts of the road. For safety, drive slowly and keep a lookout for other road users.

    Rock Pools day-use area

    Picnic facilities are provided in a pleasantly cool environment beside the large rock pool where Boulder Creek and Woondum Creek meet. Relax and unwind to the sound of water gently cascading over ancient granite outcrops.

    Picnic tables, wood fired barbecues (bring your own clean-milled firewood), water and toilets are provided.

    Explore around the creek or go for a short walk through the forest. Supervise children closely and watch out for vehicles when crossing the road between the carpark and day-use area.

    Take care around the creeks as rock surfaces can be slippery. Avoid serious injury by never jumping or diving into the creeks, as water depth is variable and unpredictable.

    Please do not feed the lace monitors. Let them find their own food and help keep wildlife wild.

    Mountain bike riding

    Mountain bike riding is permitted on vehicle tracks within the national park unless otherwise signed.

    Mountain bike riding is not permitted on walking tracks and beyond locked gates.

    Ride safely:

    • Always wear a helmet.
    • Slow down when you encounter horse riders and walkers on shared trails. Give-way to horse riders.
    • Plan ahead; ride within your ability and according to track conditions.
    • Slow down and consider other track users.
    • Avoid riding in large groups.
    • Avoid riding on soft, wet and muddy tracks.
    • Carry a first aid kit and mobile phone. Be aware that mobile phone reception can be unreliable in this area.
    • Carry a basic repairs kit.
    • Check weather and if any closures are current before heading out on your ride.

    See Park alerts.

    Ride responsibly:

    • Stay on the defined trail bike tracks.
    • Observe and obey safety and advisory signs. Respect areas closed to riding.
    • Always expect to find someone or something on the track around the next corner. You may encounter other riders, wildlife, cattle and natural obstacles such as fallen trees and water-eroded tracks.
    • Avoid skidding and sliding around turns. Collision and personal injury may result.

    Horse riding

    Horse riding is permitted on management tracks within the park. See Woondum National Park map (PDF, 126.6KB) .

    Horses are not permitted on walking tracks.

    Ride safely

    • Always wear a helmet.
    • Plan ahead; ride within your ability and according to track conditions.
    • Avoid riding in large groups.
    • Avoid riding on soft, wet and muddy tracks.
    • Carry a first aid kit and mobile phone. Be aware that mobile phone reception can be unreliable in this area.
    • Check weather and if any closures are current before heading out on your ride.

    See Park alerts.

    Help protect the park environment by adopting a minimal impact approach to riding.

    • Ride only on formed roads and trails designated for riding—riding over vegetation, taking shortcuts and forming new trails damages plants and wildlife habitat.
    • Keep tracks in good condition and limit erosion by not riding during or immediately after wet weather conditions.
    • Please help to limit the spread of weeds:
      • Ensure your clothes, shoes, bike, horses’ coats, hooves, equipment and floats are clean and free of seeds before park visits.
      • Provide weed-free, good quality, processed feed to horses at least 48 hours before entering a forest reserve or protected area.
      • Avoid riding through patches of weeds especially if they are seeding.
    • Only cross natural watercourses at designated crossing points on the trail.
    • Minimise damage to vegetation. Do not allow horses to graze on any vegetation while in the area.
    • Tether horses at hitching posts or resting areas only for short periods to minimise soil erosion and compaction.
    • Follow the code of conduct for horse riding through parks and forests—a set of guidelines for horse riders to follow to minimise their impact on park environments, and ensure they are meeting the legislative requirements of the Nature Conservation Act 1992 and the Forestry Act 1959.

    Read more about horse riding in forest areas.

    • There are currently no park alerts for this park.