Tully section, Tully Gorge National Park Tropical North Queensland

Photo credit: Photo: Jodie Bray © Qld Govt

Visiting Tully section, Tully Gorge safely

    The Tully River is popular for rafting and kayaking and for spectacular gorge views. Photo: Audrey Reilly © Queensland Government.

    The Tully River is popular for rafting and kayaking and for spectacular gorge views. Photo: Audrey Reilly © Queensland Government.

    The Cardstone weir is a perfect spot for enjoying a sandwich while overlooking the Tully River. Photo: Audrey Reilly © Queensland Government.

    The Cardstone weir is a perfect spot for enjoying a sandwich while overlooking the Tully River. Photo: Audrey Reilly © Queensland Government.

    Getting there and getting around

    Getting there and getting around

    Tully Gorge camping and day-use areas

    Turn off the Bruce Highway 1.4km south of Tully onto Dean Road, which becomes Jarra Creek Road and then Cardstone Road. Travel 41km west to the camping and day-use areas. Cardstone Road ends about 10km further on—there is no access from here to the Tablelands section of Tully Gorge National Park.

    Cochable Creek camping area

    Turn off the Bruce Highway 1.4km south of Tully onto Dean Road, which becomes Jarra Creek Road and then Cardstone Road. Travel 37.6km to the Cochable Creek/H Road turn-off on the right before you cross the Tully River, signposted as ‘Misty Mountains’. The camping area is a further 9km on unsealed road. In wet weather, this road is 4WD only. The road is unsuitable for caravans all year round. There is no access from here to the Tablelands section of Tully Gorge National Park.

    Alligators Nest day-use area

    At Tully, turn off the Bruce Highway onto Butler Street and take the first right onto Richardson Street followed by the next right onto Murray Street. Continue for 5.5km along Murray Street, which becomes Bulgan Road. At the T-intersection, turn left on to Lizzio Road and drive west 800m to the car park. There are two causeways on Lizzio Road that are subject to flash flooding so check the weather and plan your trip carefully to avoid getting stranded.

    Mount Tyson walking track

    At Tully, turn off the Bruce Highway onto Butler Street, which becomes Watkins Street. At the T-intersection, turn left onto Brannigan Street and travel to the end of the road. The walking track begins in this council reserve.

    Wheelchair accessibility

    The Butterfly walk and toilets at the Tully Gorge day-use and camping areas are wheelchair accessible (with assistance), as are the toilets at the Alligators Nest day-use area.

    Maps

    Staying safe

    • Wear appropriate safety gear and be realistic about your riding and driving abilities.
    • Be aware of other road users. Vehicles, cyclists and pedestrians use the roads in this park.
    • Obey speed limits and safety and advisory signs.
    • Let a responsible person know your travel plans and when you expect to return.
    • Take care at lookouts and around steep slopes. Remain behind the safety fences at all times.
    • Protect yourself from the sun. Wear sunscreen, a hat and a long-sleeved shirt, even on cloudy days.
    • Tully Gorge National Park is cassowary territory. Be cass-o-wary.
    • The Mount Tyson walking track should only be undertaken by fit and experienced walkers.
    • Be careful walking on boulders, which can be slippery due to moss and leaf litter.
    • At Alligators Nest, take care near the river. Rocks can be slippery, currents are strong and water levels can rise suddenly.
    • Do not swim in the Tully River at the Tully Gorge camping and day-use areas or downstream. Water released from the dam upstream can cause river levels to rise rapidly, and without warning.
    • Estuarine crocodiles occur in the section of the Tully River near the Tully Gorge camping and day-use areas—do not swim here and remember to Be crocwise.

    For more information, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

    Before you visit

    Essentials to bring

    To enjoy your visit to Tully Gorge National Park remember to bring:

    • drinking water
    • cooking utensils and equipment
    • basic first-aid kit
    • insect repellent and clothing to avoid insect bites
    • hat, sunscreen and sunglasses
    • wet-weather clothing
    • sturdy, reliable footwear
    • strong rubbish bags.

    Opening hours

    Tully Gorge National Park is open 24 hours a day.

    Permits and fees

    Camping permits

    Camping permits are required and fees apply. Your booking number must be displayed at your camp site.

    Other permits

    If you intend conducting a commercial tour, wedding, school excursion or scientific research in Tully Gorge National Park, a permit may be required. See park permits and policies for further information.

    Pets

    Domestic animals are not permitted in Tully Gorge National Park.

    Climate and weather

    In the coastal section of the park, daytime temperatures in summer often exceed 30°C and rainfall is frequent and heavy. Many consider the best time to visit is in the cooler months, from April to September.

    Fuel and supplies

    Fuel and supplies are available at Cardwell, Tully and Mission Beach. For more information see the tourism information links.

    • There are currently no park alerts for this park.