Tuchekoi National Park Sunshine Coast

View of Mount Cooroora, Tuchekoi National Park. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS Volunteer.

Things to do

    Look for small flowers like this pink nodding orchid Geodorum densiflorum growing on the forest floor. Photo: Matthew Price, QPWS Volunteer.

    Look for small flowers like this pink nodding orchid Geodorum densiflorum growing on the forest floor. Photo: Matthew Price, QPWS Volunteer.

    Western view from the summit. Photo: Matthew Price, QPWS Volunteer.

    Western view from the summit. Photo: Matthew Price, QPWS Volunteer.

    Stunted woodland growing around the summit. Photo: Matthew Price, QPWS Volunteer.

    Stunted woodland growing around the summit. Photo: Matthew Price, QPWS Volunteer.

    Allocasuarina rigida subsp. exsul is found only on Mount Cooroora. Photo: Robert Lamont.

    Allocasuarina rigida subsp. exsul is found only on Mount Cooroora. Photo: Robert Lamont.

    Shared trails provide access for horse and mountain bike riders. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS Volunteer.

    Shared trails provide access for horse and mountain bike riders. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS Volunteer.

    Camping and accommodation

    Camping

    Camping is not allowed in the national park.

    Private camping areas are located at Pomona and also a short distance away at Gympie, Boreen Point, Tewantin and Noosaville.

    Other accommodation

    There is a range of holiday accommodation in and around Gympie, Pomona, Boreen Point, Tewantin and Noosaville.

    For more information see the tourism information links.

    Track and trail classification

    Choose walks and trails that suit your fitness and skills levels.

    grade 3 walk Grade 3 walk: Suitable for most ages and fitness levels. Some bushwalking experience recommended. Tracks may have short steep hill sections, a rough surface and many steps.

    easy mountain bike trail Easy mountain bike trail: For beginner mountain bikers with basic mountain-bike skills. Wide trail, gentle gradient, some obstacles.

    easy horse trail Easy horse trail: For novice horseriders and experienced horses with basic skills and fitness. Wide trail, natural, surface, gentle slope.

    Walking track

    There is one walking track in Tuchekoi National Park. Other scenic and easier grade walks can be found close by atTewantin and Noosa national parks.

    grade 3 walk Lookout walk

    Distance: 1.1km return
    Time: allow 40min
    Access: The track starts on the southern side of Mountain Street, opposite the Noosa Council’s Cooroora picnic area.

    Explore open eucalypt forests and woodlands on this walk that finishes at a viewpoint above the tree line with coastal views.

    Tree species growing here include blackbutt, scribbly gum, bloodwood, casuarina, brush box, ironbark and tallowwood. A vulnerable species of she-oak, Allocasuarina rigida subsp. exsul, is found only on Mount Cooroora. You may see glossy black cockatoos and yellow-tailed black cockatoos feeding on she-oak seeds.

    Prepared people with a high level of fitness and rock scrambling skills can choose to continue onto the summit route that begins above the viewpoint.

    Shared trails—walkers, mountain bikers and horseriders

    There are a number of shared trails around the base of the mountain suitable for various skill levels. Refer to the Tuchekoi National Park map (PDF, 182.5KB) for details.

    grade 3 walkeasy mountain bike traileasy horse trail Cooroora shared trail

    Distance: 13km return
    Time: walkers allow 6hr
    Details: This trail is part of the Noosa Trail Network that links Pomona and Cooran. Within the park, enjoy the wonderful views of Mount Cooroora and Mount Cooran as you meander through the forest on a relatively flat trail that follows management tracks. There are a few challenging sections to thrill novice mountain-bike riders.

    Ride responsibly:

    • Always wear a helmet and appropriate safety gear.
    • Ride within your ability and according to trail conditions.
    • Slow down or stop when approaching other trail users.
    • Follow the give-way code:
      • Cyclists must give way to walkers and horseriders, and alert others when approaching them.
      • Walkers must give way to horses.
    • Keep trails in good condition by not riding during or immediately after wet weather, when tracks are soft, wet and muddy.
    • Stay on marked trails—riding over vegetation, taking shortcuts and forming new trails damages plants and wildlife habitat.
    • Respect areas closed to riding.
    • Avoid riding in large groups—keep groups to fewer than 12.
    • Bike riders:
      • Avoid skidding and sliding around turns and downhill to prevent collisions and minimise trail damage.
      • Slow down when riding over whoa-boys (drains dug diagonally to divert water and prevent erosion)—excess speed can cause loss of control and may result in injury.
    • Horse riders: rest horses for short periods only to minimise soil erosion and compaction. Do not allow horses to graze on park vegetation.

    For more details about horseriding opportunities see the SEQ horseriding trail network. Read more about mountain-bike riding and horseriding in parks and forests.

    Summit route

    Critical skills and risk information

    You need high level of fitness and rock scrambling skills for this summit route.

    This route is unsuitable for: young children and inexperienced people who cannot climb unassisted.

    Climbers be careful—serious injuries have occurred here.

    • Never attempt this route in wet weather; when rain is forecast; or in very hot weather.
    • Do not deviate from the summit route. Side tracks can end in tragedy.

    danger rockfall Rockfall can occur at any time.

    danger slippery rocks Rocks become slippery in wet conditions.

    danger steep slopesSteep slopes.

    Read more about summit route safety.

    Mount Cooroora summit route

    Time: Allow 2-3hr (including walking track access) Allow enough time to complete your climb in daylight. Start early in the day to avoid the heat.
    Access: Follow the Lookout walk that begins on the southern side of Mountain Street, opposite the Noosa Council’s park. The summit route begins above the viewpoint at the end of the walking track.

    Mount Cooroora summit route climbs upwards 439m over 1.8km. This steep summit route is world famous for its annual Pomona ‘King of the Mountain’ foot race.

    For your safety, plan ahead:

    • Check the weather and never climb in wet conditions or if it is likely to rain—wet rocks are dangerously slippery.
    • Have an experienced group leader and set a suitable group pace—keep to the pace of the least experienced rock scrambler in your group. Pushing limits can lead to injury.
    • Make sure everyone in your group has suitable sturdy, flexible soled footwear with good grip, suitable clothing and enough water.
    • Allow enough time to return in daylight. It can take twice as long to descend than it takes to get to the top.
    • Plan for emergencies. Pack a mobile phone and first aid kit.
    • Let a reliable person know your plans, and what to do if you do not return as expected. Remember to let them know if your plans change.
    • Be aware that the likelihood of rockfalls and landslides are heightened by rainfall and intense fire activity.

    On the way up:

    • Always climb with care and avoid dislodging rocks as they might hit others below you.
      • Even small rocks can cause serious injury.
      • If you accidentally dislodge rocks, shout loud warnings.
    • Stay in pairs—never climb alone. Stay within earshot of your climbing companions.
    • Turn back if conditions deteriorate.
    • Take your time and enjoy the climb.
    • Keep track of the time—return in daylight.
    • Look back regularly—sometimes people freeze in fright at the steepness on the way back down. If you feel uncomfortable, turn around.
    • Stay hydrated and eat to keep your energy levels up.

    At the top:

    • Stay well back from edges.
    • Enjoy the views—they’re fantastic!

    On the way down:

    • Use the summit route only. Side tracks can end in tragedy. People who deviate can become trapped in dead ends or on sheer cliffs.
    • Take your time. Go carefully and slowly. Go home safe. Rescues are risky, even for the rescue team.

    • There are currently no park alerts for this park.