Smithfield Conservation Park Tropical North Queensland

Photo: Tourism Tropical North Queensland

Myrtle rust found

Myrtle rust—a fungal disease affecting many native plants—has been found in this park. The disease poses a significant threat to the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area. Learn more about myrtle rust and how to minimise its spread.

About Smithfield

    Park features

    This small park (278ha) encompasses the foothills of the Macalister Range and extends to the alluvial flats of Atika and Moon creeks. The escarpment rises 350m above the suburbs of Smithfield and Trinity Beach. Dense rainforest clads the southward-facing slopes as well as the damp gullies and creek lines of the northern and eastern slopes. Open eucalypt woodlands cover the steep slopes and ridgelines of this park. These woodlands are dominated by emergent pink bloodwoods and Moreton Bay ash. Where the soil type changes acacia and swamp box open forests thrive.

    The western side of the park, along the ridge line, borders Kuranda National Park. The residential area of Smithfield adjoins the remainder of the park’s boundary.

    The Cairns Mountain Bike Club under an agreement, maintains the network of shared cross-country and downhill trails for mountain bikers, ranging from easy to extreme.

    Looking after the park

    • Dogs on leads are permitted on all shared access trails. Dogs are not permitted within the declared Restricted Access Area (PDF, 163.6KB) . All other domestic animals are not permitted in the conservation park.
    • Rubbish bins are not provided—take rubbish with you when you leave.
    • Do not remove plant material, living or dead.
    • Stay on trails at all times—this reduces the risk of injury, prevents disturbance to native vegetation and reduces erosion.
    • Never scare, chase or feed wildlife.
    • Take care not to transport pest plant seeds. To avoid bringing pest plants into the park, check your clothing, footwear and bike, and dispose of seeds prior to entering the park.

    See the guidelines on caring for parks for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks.

    Myrtle rust

    Myrtle rust—a fungal disease affecting many native plants—has been found in Smithfield Conservation Park. The disease poses a significant threat to the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area. Follow these guidelines to help prevent its spread:

    • Do not collect or move plant material, living or dead.
    • Stay on roads or vehicle tracks when walking or mountain biking to reduce contact between bikes, people and plants.
    • Avoid contact with infected plants as this may spread spores.
    • Clean your bike before you enter the park and before you leave.

    Learn more about myrtle rust and how to minimise its spread.

    Park management

    Smithfield Conservation Park was gazetted in 2000. The park borders the Kuranda National Park and the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area. The park is managed for the conservation of natural and cultural values and to provide a diverse range of recreational opportunities for visitors, through partnerships with key stakeholders.

    In 2014 the Cairns Mountain Bike Club signed a revised formal agreement to manage the entire trail network within the park (approximately 39ha), for mountain-bike riding. The club plays an important role in maintaining, managing and developing the trails, rider behaviour and events within the lease area.

    Tourism information links

    For tourism information for all regions in Queensland, see Queensland Holidays.