Rungulla National Park Tropical North Queensland

Photo credit: © Qld Govt

Things to do

    The park comes alive with nocturnal animals, for those willing to explore at night. Photo © Queensland Government.

    The park comes alive with nocturnal animals, for those willing to explore at night. Photo © Queensland Government.

    The sandy bed of the Gilbert River acts as a natural walking path for exploring the park. Photo © Queensland Government.

    The sandy bed of the Gilbert River acts as a natural walking path for exploring the park. Photo © Queensland Government.

    Camping and accommodation

    Camping

    Camping is permitted at Rungulla National Park. Permits are required and fees apply. Camping permits should be booked in advance as places are limited. There is a wheelchair-accessible toilet at camp site one, but otherwise there are no facilities and campers need to be totally self-sufficient.

    Other accommodation

    There is a range of holiday accommodation including motels and caravan parks in Georgetown, the Lynd Junction, Forsayth and Cobbold Gorge. For more information see the tourism information links.

    Walking

    There are no formal walking tracks in Rungulla National Park. However, in the drier months, the banks and sandy bed of the Gilbert River can be used as a walking path. Carry plenty of drinking water and explore during the cooler part of the day.

    Viewing wildlife

    Walking along the banks and sandy bed of the Gilbert River, visitors can enjoy the natural beauty of this area. The tracks of birds, reptiles and mammals can be seen in the sand. During the day, birds frolic in the canopy above and reptiles scurry through crevices below. The river and permanent springs in the park provide refuges for wildlife, especially as the water holes shrink in the drier months. Many animals are most active around dawn and dusk and nocturnal mammals may be seen at night by spotlight.

    When spotlighting remember to:

    • Bring binoculars.
    • Keep bulb wattage to 30 or less—this increases the chance of finding animals (by not warning them) and will extend your viewing times.
    • Use a white light to explore the forest. When viewing wildlife, add a red or orange (cellophane) filter.
    • Use all your senses to find wildlife—look for eye shine, listen for leaves rustling and inhale the smells.
    • Avoid shining light directly in the eyes of animals for any length of time.