Palmer Goldfield Resources Reserve Tropical North Queensland

Photo credit: Photo: Nick Smith © Qld Govt

Things to do

    The North Palmer River may be dry, depending on the time of year and annual rainfall. Photo: Queensland Government.

    The North Palmer River may be dry, depending on the time of year and annual rainfall. Photo: Queensland Government.

    Charcoal burners used tea tree and ironbark fuel to produce charcoal for mine forges. Photo: Queensland Government

    Charcoal burners used tea tree and ironbark fuel to produce charcoal for mine forges. Photo: Queensland Government

    Camping and accommodation

    Camping

    Camping is permitted in the North Palmer River camping area. The camping area consists of two separate sections of river bank on the southern side of the North Palmer River. There are no facilities and campers need to be totally self-sufficient. Camping permits are required and must be booked in advance—fees apply. Your booking number must be displayed at your camp site. Please camp with minimal impact and take all rubbish with you when you leave.

    Other accommodation

    Camping and caravan parks can be found along the Peninsula Development Road at Palmer River Roadhouse, Lakeland, Mount Carbine and Laura. There is a greater range of holiday accommodation in and around Mossman and Cooktown. For more information see the tourism information links below.

    Walking

    There are many historical sites to explore—visitors can walk with care around the different sites, which form an onsite museum—see staying safe for more information. Interpretive signs are located at the Chinese cemetery, Louisa mine, Comet mine and Queen of the north mine. Prospecting, panning and metal detectors are not permitted and fines apply. There is a formed walking track (500m one way) to three remnant charcoal burners (see map (PDF, 984.1KB) ).

    Driving

    Tracks in the reserve are very rough and suitable only for experienced drivers with well-equipped, high-clearance four-wheel-drive vehicles. There is current mining activity in the reserve, with numerous side tracks leading to mining leases. Stay on tracks that are signposted or marked on the map and be alert for other vehicles and machinery in the area.

    Viewing wildlife

    The dry landscape supports open woodlands of scattered ironbark and bloodwood trees with paperbarks fringing the creeks. Grey-crowned babblers, pardalotes and finches are among the most common birds spotted in the area. During wet periods, waterbirds and waders such as herons, black-necked storks, Rajah shelducks and black ducks can be seen around the river. After rain, burrowing frogs emerge from the soil.