Naree Budjong Djara National Park Brisbane

Photo credit: © Sarah Haskmann

Things to do

    Surfing is a popular recreational activity in the waters surrounding the island. Camp on the beach, then enjoy a morning surf. Photo: Queensland Government.

    Surfing is a popular recreational activity in the waters surrounding the island. Camp on the beach, then enjoy a morning surf. Photo: Queensland Government.

    Enjoy views over the Pacific Ocean from the Neembeeba 'to see' lookout in Naree Budjong Djara National Park. Photo: Queensland Government.

    Enjoy views over the Pacific Ocean from the Neembeeba 'to see' lookout in Naree Budjong Djara National Park. Photo: Queensland Government.

    Take an easy walk to Blue Lake viewing platform along the Karboora 'deep silent pool' track in Naree Budjong Djara National Park. Photo: Queensland Government.

    Take an easy walk to Blue Lake viewing platform along the Karboora 'deep silent pool' track in Naree Budjong Djara National Park. Photo: Queensland Government.

    The Gorge Walk at Point Lookout is a must do for all visitors to Minjerribah. Photo: Queensland Government.

    The Gorge Walk at Point Lookout is a must do for all visitors to Minjerribah. Photo: Queensland Government.

    Beach fishing is a popular recreational activity. Photo: Queensland Government.

    Beach fishing is a popular recreational activity. Photo: Queensland Government.

    Cycling is a great way to get around and see the sites of Minjerribah. Photo: Queensland Government.

    Cycling is a great way to get around and see the sites of Minjerribah. Photo: Queensland Government.

    Camping and accommodation

    Camping

    Camping is not currently permitted in Naree Budjong Djara National Park.

    There are a number of camping areas on Minjerribah, outside the national park (see North Stradbroke Island map (PDF, 462.7KB) ). These camping areas offer a range of facilities, including cabins, powered and unpowered sites, toilets, showers and playgrounds. For a more rugged experience, there is remote beach camping with no facilities; however, these areas can only be accessed by 4WD vehicles. Camping permits are required for all camping areas and a vehicle access permit is required to access these areas. See the tourism information links for more information.

    Other accommodation

    Private accommodation, including luxury resort accommodation with spa treatments, holiday units, holiday homes, bed and breakfasts, beach shacks and backpackers, is available at Dunwich, Amity and Point Lookout. For more information, see the tourism information links.

    Walking

    There are two walking tracks within the Blue Lake section of Naree Budjong Djara National Park. Both tracks leave from the Blue Lake car park, about 9 km from Dunwich along Alfred Martin Way.

    Neembeeba (meaning ‘to see’) lookout track—6 km return (1.5–2.5 hr) Grade: moderate

    Taking the first turn to the left from the car park, the track winds uphill through coastal wallum woodland to a sandy ridge where the ocean can be glimpsed through the trees. The vegetation is more stunted here with distinctive scribbly gums. The lookout provides magnificent views over the southern part of Minjerribah, the Pacific Ocean and the Gold Coast. The track is a gradual climb and sandy in places. In summer it can be arduous and hot.

    Karboora (meaning ‘deep silent pool’) track—5.2 km return (1.5–2 hr) Grade: easy

    The walk to Karboora (also known as Blue Lake) passes through wallum woodlands with stunted eucalypt trees, wallum banksias and a heath understorey. The edges of the lake are thickly vegetated with eucalypts, banksias and sedges, making it a haven for birds such as honeyeaters and lorikeets. The lake supports waterbirds, such as grebes and ducks, as well as several species of native freshwater fish including rainbowfish and gudgeons. Fortunate visitors may catch sight of a golden wallaby Wallabia bicolor—a form of swamp wallaby found only on Peel Island and North and South Stradbroke islands—or, on overcast days, hear the call of the near threatened Cooloola sedgefrog Litoria coolooensis. This walk is an easy grade; however, the path is loose sand and can be hot in summer.

    Karboora ‘deep silent pool’ is a place of significant cultural value to the Quandamooka people and they request that visitors respect that significance by not swimming in the lake. See nature, culture and history for more information.

    Walking opportunities outside the national park

    Gorge walk

    The Gorge walk at Point Lookout is a must for all visitors to the island. This gentle walk offers outstanding views across the ocean and is an ideal vantage point for spotting marine life, such as turtles, dolphins and manta rays. From June to November, visitors can delight in watching humpback whales pass close to the coastline on their annual migration. The Gorge walk also offers stunning views along beautiful Main Beach to Jumpinpin, the island’s southern tip.

    Brown Lake

    Brown Lake is only 3.5 km from Dunwich and accessed via Alfred Martin Way. There are barbecue and picnic facilities, making it a great place to relax with the family. Brown Lake is a perched lake containing tannin-stained water from the leaves of surrounding paperbarks and tea trees, as well as the organic matter on its floor. Outdoor activities at Brown Lake include walking around the lake on fire tracks, bird watching and viewing or photographing wildflowers.

    Swimming and surfing

    The island is a haven for swimmers, body boarders and surfers.

    Dunwich and Amity both have enclosed swimming areas making them ideal for families with young children. Do not swim in the deep channel out from Amity due to strong currents and the possible presence of sharks.

    Flinders Beach is accessed by four-wheel drive from Amity or Point Lookout and offers excellent foreshore camping and swimming. The headland at Adder Rock often provides a point break for surfers.

    Home Rock separates Home Beach and Cylinder Beach. Four-wheel-driving is not permitted on Home Beach, which makes it a perfect spot to relax away from the crowds.

    Cylinder Beach is a very popular, sheltered beach with a well serviced camping area. It has a lovely calm inshore area perfect for families and is also well known for its point break off the headland, ideal for surfers and body boarders.

    Main Beach stretches from Point Lookout to the remote southern tip of the island. The patrolled area at Point Lookout is the most popular swimming beach on the island and with southerly winds it is also a favourite with surfers and body boarders. Rips and side currents are a possibility, so swimmers should always stay between the flags.

    Visit the Surf Life Saving Beach Safe website for patrolled beaches and local conditions.

    Boating and fishing

    Boating and fishing are prohibited in Naree Budjong Djara National Park but both of these activities are popular in the marine waters of Moreton Bay Marine Park surrounding Minjerribah.

    There are public boat ramps at One Mile (near Dunwich) and Amity, which provides access to the calm waters of the channel between North Stradbroke and Moreton islands.

    The deep, clear Rainbow Channel runs just off the shore, making Amity an ideal spot for launching boats or casting straight into deep water from the beach or jetty.

    Beach fishing is a very popular past-time with visitors to the island, particularly off the popular foreshore camping areas of Flinders Beach and Main Beach.

    Five marine national park (green) zones of the Moreton Bay Marine Park (PDF, 2.7MB) lie along the coastline of Minjerribah. All forms of collecting, including fishing, are prohibited in these areas. Refer to the Moreton Bay Marine Park user guide (PDF, 10.6MB) for boundaries and restrictions relating to zones and designated areas.

    Fish right

    • Keep fish, bait and burley in sealed containers away from wildlife.
    • Bury fish remains and unused bait just below high tide mark. Dig a deep hole and cover scraps with at least 50 cm of sand.
    • Dispose of used bait bags and unwanted fishing line in bins or take them home.
    • All freshwater fish are protected on the island.
    • Fishing or collecting bait in lakes and streams is not permitted.

    Guided tours

    Minjerribah is an outdoor enthusiast’s paradise and there are a number of commercial tours on offer. Discover natural wonders off the beaten track on a four-wheel drive tour; catch dinner on a fishing tour; explore the waters surrounding the island on a sea kayaking tour; reveal underwater secrets on a diving or snorkelling tour and learn to surf at a local surf school. For more information, refer to tourism information links.

    Picnic and day-use areas

    There are currently no day-use or picnic areas in Naree Budjong Djara National Park.

    Council provided barbecue and picnic facilities including a children’s playground is located near Brown Lake just 3.5km from Dunwich.

    Viewing wildlife

    The best time to view wildlife is in the early morning and late afternoon.

    Other things to do

    The two walking tracks in the Blue Lake section of Naree Budjong Djara National Park are the only recreational facilities currently provided in the national park. However, there are a number of recreational opportunities available on Minjerribah.

    Enjoy birdwatching, go body boarding or surfing off one of the many beaches, hire a bicycle or a boat, play a round of golf, try your luck with a fishing rod, join a guided tour or go for a walk. See the tourism information links for more recreational opportunities available on Minjerribah.

    • There are currently no park alerts for this park.