Moorrinya National Park Outback Queensland

Photo credit: Photo: Fiona O'Grady © Qld Govt

Things to do

    Red-winged parrot at Moorrinya National Park. Photo: Brian Furby Collection.

    Red-winged parrot at Moorrinya National Park. Photo: Brian Furby Collection.

    Squatter pigeons are often seen at Moorrinya National Park. Photo: Brian Furby Collection.

    Squatter pigeons are often seen at Moorrinya National Park. Photo: Brian Furby Collection.

    Male ornate burrowing frogs can often be heard in the wet season. Photo: Eleanor Collins, Queensland Government

    Male ornate burrowing frogs can often be heard in the wet season. Photo: Eleanor Collins, Queensland Government

    Listen for calling ruddy treefrogs. Photo: Tony Salisbury, Queensland Government

    Listen for calling ruddy treefrogs. Photo: Tony Salisbury, Queensland Government

    Camping and accommodation

    Camping

    Seven camp sites have been established near the old Shirley shearing shed and a composting toilet is the only facility. A camping permit is required and fees apply. A tag with your booking number must be displayed at your camp site.

    Other accommodation

    A range of accommodation, including hotels, camping and caravan parks, are available at Torrens Creek, Hughenden, Pentland and Charters Towers. For more information, see the tourism information links.

    Walking

    Bullock Creek Walk (Grade: easy)

    Distance: 200m return

    Time: allow 15mins walking time

    Details: Take this short stroll from the camping area to Bullock Creek. The track is not formed or marked. At the creek look for native fish including spangled perch Leiopotherapon unicolor, glassfish Ambassis sp. and silver catfish Plotosus argenteus. Waterbirds, such as the hoary-headed grebe Poliocephalus poliocephalus and Australasian darter Anhinga novaehollandiae, may be seen searching for food amongst the reeds. Shade is limited so try to walk in the cooler parts of the day.

    Driving

    Maps

    Ride trail bikes and drive four-wheel-drives on Moorinya’s internal roads and firebreaks. Riders and drivers must be licensed and trail bikes and vehicles must be fully registered. Normal road rules apply and penalties will be enforced. Vehicle access is not maintained within the stock route. Expect to share the roads with pedestrians, cyclists and other vehicles.

    Stay on formed roads—trail bikes and vehicles are not permitted off-road or on the walking track.

    For more information, see trail-bike riding and four-wheel-driving.

    Mountain biking

    Maps

    Mountain bike on Moorinya’s internal roads and firebreaks. Expect to share the roads with wildlife, pedestrians and vehicles.

    For more information, see cycling.

    Viewing wildlife

    The park is popular with birdwatchers and nature lovers—165 bird, 40 reptile, 17 mammal, nine frog and seven fish species have been recorded in the park.

    Red-winged parrots Aprosmictus erythropteru, pale headed rosellas Platycercus adscitus and sulphur-crested cockatoos Cacatua galerita are often seen near the camping area, especially at dawn and dusk.

    During the day look for koalas Phascolarctos cinereus sleeping in the canopy, and eastern grey kangaroos Macropus giganteus, common wallaroos Macropus robustus and red kangaroos Macropus rufus seeking shade from the sun’s heat. Double-barred finches Taneiopygia bichenovii and chestnut-breasted mannikins Lonchura castaneothorax are often seen feeding on and near the ground, as are squatter pigeons Geophaps scripta.

    At night listen for the ‘woof woof’ call of barking owls Ninox connivens and look for sugar gliders Petaurus breviceps soaring between trees. During the wet season the park comes alive with the sounds of frog calls. Listen for ornate burrowing frogs Platyplectrum ornatum, greenstripe frogs Cyclorana alboguttata, ruddy treefrogs Litoria rubella and northern laughing treefrogs Litoria rothi.

    • There are currently no park alerts for this park.