Mapleton National Park Sunshine Coast

Photo credit: Photo: Steven Nowakowski © Tourism and Events Qld

Things to do

    Gheerulla Creek flows beside the small camping area. Photo: Ross Naumann, Queensland Government volunteer.

    Gheerulla Creek flows beside the small camping area. Photo: Ross Naumann, Queensland Government volunteer.

    Lush forest on the Linda Garrett Circuit, Mapleton National Park. Photo: Ross Naumann, Queensland Government volunteer.

    Lush forest on the Linda Garrett Circuit, Mapleton National Park. Photo: Ross Naumann, Queensland Government volunteer.

    Piluaris Walk is an easy forest walk with a beautiful fern understorey. Photo: Ross Naumann, Queensland Government volunteer.

    Piluaris Walk is an easy forest walk with a beautiful fern understorey. Photo: Ross Naumann, Queensland Government volunteer.

    View from Point Glorious Lookout, Mapleton National Park. Photo: Ross Naumann, Queensland Government volunteer.

    View from Point Glorious Lookout, Mapleton National Park. Photo: Ross Naumann, Queensland Government volunteer.

    Scribbly gums and grass trees grow at Point Glorious Lookout. Photo: Ross Naumann, Queensland Government volunteer.

    Scribbly gums and grass trees grow at Point Glorious Lookout. Photo: Ross Naumann, Queensland Government volunteer.

    Licensed riders using registered motorcycles can ride through bushland on the Gheerulla Trail Bike Track. Photo: Ross Naumann, Queensland Government volunteer.

    Licensed riders using registered motorcycles can ride through bushland on the Gheerulla Trail Bike Track. Photo: Ross Naumann, Queensland Government volunteer.

    Camping and accommodation

    Camping

    Mapleton National Park has a small camping area at Gheerulla Creek beside the entrance to the Gheerulla trail bike track.

    Gheerulla camping area is close to the creek. Facilities include picnic tables, toilets and fire rings. This small camping area is not suitable for caravans.

    If you plan to use the fire rings, bring your own milled firewood, as it is illegal to collect wood from the park. Preferably bring and use a fuel stove.

    Camping permits are required and fees apply.

    For walkers on the 58km Sunshine Coast Hinterland Great Walk, there are walkers' camps at Thilba Thalba and Ubajee in Mapleton National Park. Please see the Sunshine Coast Hinterland Great Walk for more information.

    Other accommodation

    There is a wide range of holiday accommodation in and around Montville, Mapleton, Maleny and other towns in the Sunshine Coast hinterland. For more information see the tourism information links.

    Picnic and day-use areas

    Two picnic and day-use areas are provided in Mapleton National Park—Mapleton day-use area and Point Glorious day-use area.

    • Mapleton day-use area: Located in tall blackbutt forest (Eucalyptus pilularis) and on the site of an old forest station. Picnic tables, toilets and barbecues are provided. If you plan to use the barbecues, bring your own milled firewood, as it is illegal to collect wood from the forest. Preferably bring and use a fuel stove.
    • Point Glorious day-use area: Point Glorious, approximately 400m above sea level, provides spectacular views of the coast and hinterland. Scribbly gums and grass trees grow around the lookout. Abseiling enthusiasts can apply their skills on the rhyolite bluffs at Point Glorious.

    Walking

    Several short walking tracks are provided in Mapleton National Park.

    The Sunshine Coast Hinterland Great Walk, a 58km Grade 4 walking track with overnight campsites, passes through Mapleton National Park. Walkers can also take shorter day walks along this great walk.

    There are also other short walk opportunities nearby in Mapleton Falls National Park and Kondalilla National Park.

    Caution: Do not enter the forest in strong wind conditions—blackbutt, flooded gum and other trees growing here are prone to dropping branches. Strong wind increases the risk of branch fall and injury.

    Key to track standards

    Use the walking track grade listed with each walking track description to choose walks suitable for your group’s abilities and fitness levels.

    Walking track grades

    Grade 2 walking trackGrade 2 track

    • No bushwalking experience required.
    • The track is a hardened or compacted surface and may have gentle hills sections and occasional steps.

    Grade 3 walking trackGrade 3 track

    • Suitable for most ages and fitness levels.
    • Some bushwalking experience recommended.
    • Tracks may have short steep hills, a rough surface and many steps.

    Grade 4 walking trackGrade 4 track

    • Bushwalking experience recommended.
    • Tracks may be long, rough and very steep.
    • Directional signs may be limited.

    Walking tracks

    Grade 2 walking trackLinda Garrett Circuit (Grade 2)

    Distance: 700m return

    Time: allow 20mins

    Details: This circuit leads through rainforest, a palm grove and tall wet eucalypt forest dominated by blackbutt, turpentine, brush box and flooded gum.

    Grade 2 walking trackPilularis Walk (Grade 2)

    Distance: 400m

    Time: allow 20mins

    Details: This walk leads through tall open forest with an understorey of ferns and rainforest shrubs.

    Grade 3 walking trackBonyee Walk (Grade 3)

    Distance: 400m

    Time: allow 10mins

    Details: This track is named using local Kabi Kabi language for bunya. The walk features a very large bunya pine, rainforest and a piccabeen palm grove.

    Shared trails and mountain bike trails

    Walkers, cyclists and horse riders can explore the park on shared trails.

    Mountain-bike riding is permitted on shared trails and dedicated mountain bike trails.

    Bicycles are not permitted on designated walking tracks and Gheerulla Trail Bike Track.

    Caution: Do not enter the forest in strong wind conditions—blackbutt, flooded gum and other trees growing here are prone to dropping branches. Strong wind increases the risk of branch fall and injury.

    Grade 4 walking trackIntermediate grade mountain biking trackIntermediate grade horse trailMountain bike trail and shared trails are intermediate grade:

    • Wide trail, natural surfaces, moderate slope, some obstacles. Some trails include steep sections.
    • Suitable for experienced horse riders and horses with moderate skills and fitness; skilled mountain bikers; fit walkers with bushwalking experience.

    Follow the give-way code:

    • Be careful and courteous.
    • Cyclists must give-way to walkers and horse riders, and alert others when approaching them.
    • Walkers must give-way to horses.

    Grade 4 walking trackIntermediate grade mountain biking trackIntermediate grade horse trailTurpentine Trail (Class 4)

    Distance: 7.8km return
    Details: Surround yourself in forest on this narrow, undulating two-way trail through wet eucalypt forest and scribbly gum forest with a heath understorey.

    Grade 4 walking trackIntermediate grade mountain biking trackIntermediate grade horse trailPiccabeen Circuit (Class 4)

    Distance: 6.7km return
    Details: Discover tall blackbutt forest and rainforest communities. Enjoy several crossings of Gheerulla Creek.

    Grade 4 walking trackIntermediate grade mountain biking trackIntermediate grade horse trailKureelpa Falls Circuit (Class 4)

    Distance: 8.5km
    Details: The first half of this trail descends 200m in elevation. Halfway along the circuit, take a short walk (400m return) down to view Kureelpa Falls on the South Maroochy River.

    Intermediate grade mountain biking trackOaky Creek Lookout Mountain Bike Trail (intermediate)

    Distance: 19km return
    Details: Explore different forest communities as you travel along this trail. Wet eucalypt forest gives way to drier woodland with a grassy understorey along the ridge. From the Oaky Creek Lookout enjoy spectacular views of the Conondale Range and Mary Valley.
    Bike riders beware:

    • Gheerulla Trail Bike Track runs next to and crosses the Oaky Creek Lookout Trail. Give way to motorbikes at all times.
    • Blackbutt and other trees growing here are prone to dropping branches that can get caught in bike spokes and chains. Strong wind increases the risk of branch fall and injury.

    Horse riding

    Horse riders can explore parts of the park on shared trails and the South East Queensland horse riding trail network.

    A horse float parking area is provided on Mapleton Forest Road, approximately 2.5km north-west of Mapleton.

    Horses are not permitted on designated walking tracks.

    A special permit is not required unless it is a commercial activity, an organised event activity or a competitive event. Contact us for further information.

    Read and view maps about the horse trail networks in this region.

    Trail-bike riding

    Gheerulla trail bike track provides licensed riders using registered motorcycles with about 26km of forest trail riding experience. A special permit is not required.

    Ride responsibly

    • Stay on the defined trail bike tracks.
    • Observe and obey safety and advisory signs.
    • Most of the track is one way to maximise rider safety. Follow directional signs.
    • Ride cautiously on the two-way trail sections.
    • Be aware that a separate mountain bike trail runs between the trail bike track loop. For everyone’s safety and enjoyment, stay on the trail bike track.
    • Always expect to find someone or something on the track around the next corner. You may encounter other riders, wildlife, cattle and natural obstacles such as fallen trees and water-eroded tracks.
    • Trail bikes are not permitted on trails for walkers, mountain bikers and horse riders.
    • Do not enter the forest in strong wind conditions—blackbutt, flooded gum and other trees growing here are prone to dropping branches. Strong wind increases the risk of branch fall and injury.
    • Avoid spinning your rear tyre excessively as this leads to erosion problems. Ride sensibly so this recreational facility can be available for future use.

    See other trail-bike riding opportunities.

    Driving

    The Mapleton Forest Road starts just north of Mapleton and leads to spectacular views of the coast and hinterland from Point Glorious. Scribbly gums and grass trees grow around the lookout. This forest road is suitable for four-wheel-drive vehicles only. It is unsealed and varies in condition depending on weather impacts and maintenance.

    Forest roads—expect the unexpected!

    Unsealed forest roads can be steep and winding.

    • Slow down. Allow time to react to unexpected situations and changed conditions. You may encounter other drivers, cyclists, walkers, horse riders, cattle and wildlife.
    • Be courteous. Pull over to the left to allow vehicles to pass. Do not stop in the middle of the roadway for photography and enjoying the scenery. Find a safe place to pull over or turn around.
    • Watch out for corners and steep slopes. Drive carefully around corners, especially after rain. Stay on your side of the road and avoid sudden slowing. Shift down a gear when roads are steep.
    • All road rules apply. Obey speed limits. Always wear a seat belt. Never carry passengers outside the vehicle cabin.
    • Avoid using forest roads during and immediately after wet weather to reduce damage to road surfaces and for your own safety. Do not attempt to cross flooded creeks.
    • Roads may be rough. Forest roads are often rough, with potholes and wash-outs. Driving too fast may be dangerous or cause damage to your vehicle. Drive slowly.

    Roped sports—abseiling and rock climbing

    At Point Glorious, abseiling and rock climbing enthusiasts can apply their skills on the rhyolite bluffs. The department approved anchor points are provided near the lookout. Do not interfere with fixed equipment on the cliff or anchor to trees or the lookout platform.

    For your safety:

    • Assess the site for hazards and suitability for your experience and skill level.
    • Check weather conditions and wear appropriate clothing.
    • Use anchor points provided. Do not interfere with fixed equipment on the cliff or anchor to trees.
    • Wear a helmet, harness and footwear and use ropes and protective equipment (karabiners, slings and chocks) designed for abseiling and follow manufacturer's specifications.
    • Carry emergency communication equipment and a first-aid kit. Tell a responsible person where and when you plan to abseil.
    • Never abseil under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
    • Minimise vegetation disturbance to protect the area from erosion and the introduction of pest plant species.

    • There are currently no park alerts for this park.