Kroombit Tops National Park Gladstone | Outback Queensland | Bundaberg

Photo credit: Photo: Maxime Coquard © Tourism and Events Qld

Things to do

    Camping and accommodation

    Camping

    Three camping areas are provided—Griffiths Creek camping area, The Razorback camping area and The Wall camping area.

    • Griffith Creek camping area is accessible by conventional vehicle in dry conditions only.
    • Razorback camping area is accessible by four-wheel-drive.
    • The Wall camping area is accessible by a rough track suitable only for high clearance four-wheel-drives.

    Facilities are not provided in these camping areas—campers must be fully self-sufficient.

    You must book your camping permit before you arrive. Be aware that you cannot make a camping booking at the camping area—phone reception is very poor. Penalties apply for camping without a permit.

    Fees apply and a tag with your booking number must be displayed at your camp site.

    Other accommodation

    There is a range of holiday accommodation in and around Gladstone, Calliope, Monto, Biloela and Ubobo. See the tourism information links for more details.

    The lookout provides scenic views to the north-east. Photo: Queensland Government.

    The lookout provides scenic views to the north-east. Photo: Queensland Government.

    If you are travelling from Biloela on the Razorback track you can stop and enjoy the Marble waterhole. Photo: Queensland Government.

    If you are travelling from Biloela on the Razorback track you can stop and enjoy the Marble waterhole. Photo: Queensland Government.

    Griffith Creek runs beside the Griffith Creek camping area. It is a great place to camp or have a picnic. Photo: Queensland Government.

    Griffith Creek runs beside the Griffith Creek camping area. It is a great place to camp or have a picnic. Photo: Queensland Government.

    Landscape view from The Loop road, a high clearance 4WD circuit. Photo: Queensland Government.

    Landscape view from The Loop road, a high clearance 4WD circuit. Photo: Queensland Government.

    Walking

    Three short walking tracks and a longer hike give you a closer look at Kroombit Tops’ many natural and cultural attractions.

    Key to track standardsUse walking track grades to choose a walk suitable for your group’s ability and fitness.

    Grade 1 walking trackGrade 1 track

    • No bushwalking experience required.
    • Flat, well-formed track, no steps and clearly sign posted.
    • Suitable for wheelchairs with assistance.

    Grade 3 walking trackGrade 3 track

    • Suitable for most ages and fitness levels.
    • Some bushwalking experience required.
    • Tracks may have short steep sections, a rough surface and many steps.

    Track descriptions

    Grade 1 walking track The lookout walk (Grade 1)

    Distance: 100m return
    Allow: 10min
    Details: Suitable for wheelchairs—this track has a natural hard dirt surface, a gentle incline, and single roadway width. Spectacular views from the eastern escarpment looking over the Boyne Valley—look for ribbons of dark green rainforest among the paler eucalyptus woodlands in the valley below.

    Grade 3 walking track Rainforest walk (Grade 3)

    Distance: 300m return
    Allow: 10min
    Details: Discover Kroombit Tops’ unusual tropical rainforest along this easy circuit track through palms, vines and tall trees near Munholme Creek.

    Grade 3 walking trackBeautiful Betsy bomber crash site (Grade 3)

    Distance: 700m return
    Allow: 30min
    Details: This short walk takes you to the final resting place of Beautiful Betsy a WWII Liberator bomber that crashed on the western side of the plateau in 1945. Interpretive signs along the way help you understand the tragic event. This area is a war grave; please treat it respectfully and leave it as you found it.

    Grade 3 walking track Escarpment track (Grade 3)

    Distance: 13km one-way
    Time: 5hr
    Details: Hike this track along the eastern escarpment through open blackbutt forest with glimpses of the Boyne Valley to the north-east. Watch for peregrine falcons soaring around rocky cliff tops. Please keep to the track and away from the cliff edges. Camping is not permitted along the escarpment. This is not a circuit track, so arrange a support vehicle to drop you off and pick you up.

    Remote hikes

    Rugged gorges and sandstone escarpments challenge even the most experienced bushwalkers. Before embarking on a remote hike, plan your trip well in advance. Contact us for further information to help you plan a safe and enjoyable trip.

    Driving

    You can take an adventurous drive along 4WD-only routes in the park’s drier rocky west.

    Be cautious! Horses, cattle and wildlife may run on to the road anywhere in this country area. Be alert and drive with caution.

    The Bicentennial National Trail shares some roads within the park—as you drive look out for horse riders, mountain-bike riders and walkers.

    The Bomber crash site

    Distance: 20km one-way from the Tableland Road/Loop Road junction.
    Time: allow 2hr

    High-clearance four-wheel-drive vehicles recommended; route suitable for most drivers. May be accessible by other all-wheel-drives with good clearance and four-wheel-driving experience but caution is required to avoid vehicle damage.

    Take an easy drive along the two-way section of the Loop Road. Take the Bomber site turnoff onto a narrower two-way track—drive cautiously on this section as you may have to pull over to allow an oncoming vehicle to pass.

    Take the short walk 700m into the bomber crash site.

    The Loop road

    Distance: 35km circuit
    Time: allow 2hr

    Route is suitable for high clearance four-wheel-drives only and drivers with a reasonable level of bush track four-wheel-driving experience.

    It is not suitable for all-wheel-drive vehicles and inexperienced drivers.

    The route includes steep rocky sections and a narrower one-way traffic only section.

    Beyond the Bomber Crash site turnoff, the road narrows and includes rough, rocky sections that require caution to avoid vehicle damage.

    The Wall is a great place to stop for a picnic.

    Travelling north from The Wall, the track is one-way only to the main access road. You will notice the vegetation change from dry open forest to wetter blackbutt dominated forest as you drive north. Enjoy stunning vistas over gorges and valleys from two natural lookouts along this section of the road.

    The Razorback Track

    Distance: 27km one-way from the Valentine Plains Road entrance on the western park boundary to Tablelands Road.
    Time: allow 2hr

    This track is not suitable for all-wheel-drive vehicles and inexperienced drivers.

    Route is suitable for high clearance four-wheel-drives only and drivers with a reasonable level of bush track four-wheel-driving experience. It is a dry-weather-only track.

    The route includes numerous creek crossings, steep ascents and descents, and narrow sections.

    The Razorback track takes visitors from Kroombit Tops’ western boundary up through rugged terrain in panoramic scenery atop twisting ridges and into the core of the park. It is also accessible at its eastern end via Tablelands Road as a challenging and rewarding scenic drive.

    Read more about four-wheel-driving in parks.

    Day-use areas

    The lookout

    Day-use facilities—picnic tables and a toilet—are located beside the car park.

    Take a short 100m return walk to the lookout to enjoy spectacular views over the Boyne Valley from the eastern escarpment. Look for ribbons of dark green rainforest among the paler eucalyptus woodlands in the valley below.

    Picnicking in other areas

    Enjoy a forest picnic in any of Kroombit Tops’ cleared grassy areas. The banks of Griffith Creek, opposite the camping area, are an ideal place to enjoy a picnic.

    Remember, you need to be entirely self-sufficient when picnicking away from facilities. Bury all toilet waste at least 20cm deep and 100m from waterways, tracks and camp sites. Preferably bring a portable toilet to minimise pollution in this area—dispose of toilet waste appropriately.

    Viewing wildlife

    Wildlife is best spotted early in the morning or in the evening.

    By day, rock-wallabies bound across rocky outcrops near Kroombit Creek. At night, micro-bats hunt for insects in the dry rainforest and yellow-bellied gliders scurry through the tree tops while powerful owls hunt for prey.

    You may see flashes of colour as flocks of scaly-breasted, rainbow and little lorikeets screech through open woodlands. Wedge-tailed eagles soar above and peregrine falcons nest on escarpment cliffs. Listen for green catbirds and paradise riflebirds—their distinctive calls fill the rainforest with sound.

    Encounter eastern water dragons, lace monitors and red-bellied black snakes sunning themselves by creeks. Look for small darting lizards on rocky ledges.

    Only at Kroombit Tops can you hear the unusual call of the endangered Kroombit tinkerfrog—listen for a series of sharp, metallic 'tinks'. This elusive frog lives in small patches of rainforest where it is believed to spend much of its time hiding between large rocks.

    Bicentennial National Trail

    The trail traverses Kroombit Tops National Park in an east–west direction, with designated camps along the way. A large section of the trail is open only to hikers, non-motorised vehicles and horses. Contact the Bicentennial National Trail on 1300 138 724 or visit the National Trail website for maps and further information.

    Read about the horseriding trail networks in parks and forests.