Isla Gorge National Park Outback Queensland

Photo credit: © Robert Ashdown

Things to do

    Camping and accommodation

    Camping

    Located on top of the gorge, the Isla Gorge camping area is close to natural cliff faces with sheer drops. One slip could be fatal—serious injury or death may result from walking near the edge. Children need to be supervised closely.

    Camping permits are required and fees apply.

    Note, onsite self-registration is no longer available.

    Other accommodation

    A range of holiday accommodation is available in and around the nearby towns of Taroom, Theodore and Miles. For more information see the Tourism information links.

    Take care and keep away from the edges on this short walk to a natural lookout. Photo: Robert Ashdown © Queensland Government

    Take care and keep away from the edges on this short walk to a natural lookout. Photo: Robert Ashdown © Queensland Government

    Walking

    Key to track standards

    The classification system is based on Australian Standards. Please note that while each track is classified according to its most difficult section, other sections may be easier.

    Grade 4 walking trackGrade 4 track

    • Distinct tracks with junctions signposted. Rough track surfaces with exposed roots and rocks.
    • Variable in width. Muddy sections and steep grades likely to be encountered.
    • May be extensively overgrown, hazards such as fallen trees and rock falls likely to be present.
    • Caution needed at creek crossings, cliff edges and naturally occurring lookouts.
    • Moderate fitness level with bushwalking experience and ankle-supporting footwear recommended.

    Grade 4 walking trackIsla Gorge track—800m return (allow 25 minutes)

    A short walk following a spur to a natural lookout overlooking Gorge Creek and Devils Nest. This walk begins at the end of the carpark. Walkers must be prepared to clamber over rocky outcrops before reaching the end of the track.

    There are no designated walking tracks down into and within the gorge. Loose, crumbly rock makes the descent dangerous. Only well-equipped, experienced walkers should enter this part of the park. To safely explore the park, away from the day-use areas, you will need to use the Ghinghinda 1:100,000 topographic map.

    DangerDANGER: Unfenced cliff edges. One slip could be fatal—serious injury or death may result from walking near the edge. Keep to the track. Supervise children closely.

    Picnic in the shelter at Isla Gorge day-use area. Photo: Robert Ashdown © Queensland Government

    Picnic in the shelter at Isla Gorge day-use area. Photo: Robert Ashdown © Queensland Government

    Picnic and day-use areas

    Only 1.3km from the highway, the picnic and camping area overlook Isla Gorge. The picnic area has composting toilets, a wood barbecue, picnic shelter, water tank (treat water before drinking). Sit and relax while being mesmerised by the view.

    The beautiful but elusive Herbert's rock-wallaby. Photo: Robert Ashdown © Queensland Government

    The beautiful but elusive Herbert's rock-wallaby. Photo: Robert Ashdown © Queensland Government

    Viewing wildlife

    Many types of birds live in the park, providing the perfect opportunity for birdwatching. See wedge-tailed eagles and peregrine falcons souring above the gorge. Honeyeaters splurge on wattle, eucalypt, boronia and grevillea flowers from mid-winter to summer.

    Whiptail wallabies and grey kangaroos can be seen within the gorge. The Herbert's rock-wallaby also lives in the park, but is rarely seen.

    • There are currently no park alerts for this park.