Thorsborne Trail, Hinchinbrook Island National Park Tropical North Queensland

Thornborne trail between Little Ramsay Bay and Zoe Bay Photo credit: Tamara Vallance © Qld Govt

Visiting the Thorsborne Trail safely

    Getting there and getting around

    The Hinchinbrook Channel. Photo: Queensland Government.

    The Hinchinbrook Channel. Photo: Queensland Government.

    Access to the Thorsborne Trail is either by private vessel, launched from Cardwell or Lucinda (Dungeness), or by the commercial ferries which transport people to both ends of the trail. Services may vary according to weather, tidal conditions and time of year.

    Commercial ferry transport to the northern or southern end of the Thorsborne Trail

    Hinchinbrook Island Cruises

    www.hinchinbrookislandcruises.com.au
    Phone: 0499 335 383
    Email: info@hinchinbrookislandcruises.com.au

    Absolute North Charters

    www.absolutenorthcharters.com.au
    Phone: 0419 712 577
    Email: info@absolutenorthcharters.com.au

    Wheelchair accessibility

    There are no wheelchair-accessible facilities or tracks on the Thorsborne Trail.

    Staying safe

    In an emergency, personal locator beacons alert rescue authorities that you are in distress and aid their search in locating you. Photo: Tamara Vallance, Queensland Government.

    PLBs are available for a small donation. Photo: Tamara Vallance, Queensland Government

    Estaurine crocodiles are present in creeks, rivers, lagoons and along the coast of Hinchinbrook Island. Photo: Queensland Government.

    Estaurine crocodiles are present in creeks, rivers, lagoons and along the coast of Hinchinbrook Island. Photo: Queensland Government.

    It is imperative that hiking details are left with a responsible contact person. This will assist in the event of an emergency situation or when hikers are overdue. The contact person must know:

    • how hikers are accessing the island e.g. private vessel or water taxi
    • the planned route
    • when hikers are due to return
    • the agreed time period after which the contact person will need to contact emergency services.
    • call Triple Zero (000) for all emergencies or if hikers do not return within agreed time period.

    If no longer hiking the trail, ensure to cancel bookings by contacting us. Information on cancellations assists in emergencies such as cyclones and wildfires.

    • For a small donation, personal locator beacons (PLBs) are available for hire from the Rainforest and Reef Information Centre.
    • The fawn-footed melomys Melomys cervinipes and giant white-tailed rat Uromys caudimaculatus occur across the island. To avoid damage to packs and food supplies:
      • Remove all food from packs at night.
      • Keep cooking utensils and food covered and off the ground.
      • Do not hang packs in trees.
    • Dangerous stinging jellyfish (‘stingers’) may be present in the waters surrounding Hinchinbrook Island at any time, bur occur more frequently in the warmer months. Do not swim in tidal waters. See marine stingers for more information.
    • Avoid bites from sandflies and mosquitoes by using insect repellant and wearing long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
    • Creek beds and rock surfaces can be slippery. Care is required when traversing these surfaces.
    • Heavy rain can fall at any time of the year causing creek levels to rise and fall rapidly. Conditions may improve after a short wait. Crossing creeks requires extreme care, particularly at Zoe and Diamantina creeks.
    • Mulligan Falls and its surrounds are a restricted access area (PDF, 340.6KB) . Death and serious injuries have occurred when people have entered this area. Rock pavements, including those well back from the falls, are extremely slippery and dangerous.
    • Water is available in several creeks along the trail but becomes scarce during the dry season. Please carry sufficient water during this time. If creeks are dry or salty at recommended watering points, fresh water can often be obtained upstream. Treat all water before using.
    • Tides can range up to four metres. Be aware of tide levels when crossing creeks, particularly Mulligan Creek. Refer to the Lucinda tide timetable.
    • In an emergency, remain on the trail and call Triple Zero (000) if mobile reception is available. Otherwise, send help to the nearest bay or coastal location to alert a passing or anchored vessel. Alternatively, send help to either end of the trail and alert the ferry operators when they arrive.
    • Emergency calls via marine radio, on VHF channel 16, should be made to the Australian Volunteer Coast Guard Association at Ingham for the southern end of the island (call sign VMR414), at Cardwell for the northern end of the island (call sign VMR423), or Townsville if the local stations are not responding (call sign VMR408).

    Be crocwise!

    Be aware that crocodiles can turn up anywhere in croc country, including tidal reaches of rivers, along beaches, on offshore islands and cays in the Great Barrier Reef and Torres Strait, and in freshwater lagoons, rivers, and swamps. Crocodiles are dangerous and attacks can be fatal. Remember to be crocwise in croc country.

    Before you visit

    Pack sturdy, reliable footwear. Photo: Tamara Vallance, Queensland Government.

    Pack sturdy, reliable footwear. Photo: Tamara Vallance, Queensland Government.

    Our precious Great Barrier Reef World Heritage islands are among the most pest-free islands in the world. They need your help to stay this way. Please Be pest-free! (PDF, 573.6KB) before your visit.

    Essentials to bring

    Hikers need to be self-reliant and self-sufficient. Pack essential equipment and bushwalking gear including:

    • adequate water-carrying containers, as each person will use around four litres of water a day
    • waterproof pack liner or bags
    • warm and waterproof clothing
    • sturdy, reliable footwear
    • hat, sunscreen and sunglasses
    • basic first-aid kit including space blanket
    • compass
    • Lucinda tide timetable
    • gas or liquid fuel stove with spare fuel
    • cooking utensils and equipment
    • torch or headlamp
    • high quality, lightweight and waterproof tent
    • insect repellent and clothing to avoid insect bites
    • biodegradable toilet paper and hand trowel
    • strong rubbish bag
    • personal locator beacon (PLB) or emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPRIB)
    • lightweight sleeping bag
    • nourishing food that is compact and lightweight including nuts, dried fruit, pasta, rice, lentils, dehydrated foods, selected fresh vegetables, muesli, hard cheese, crackers, chocolate, pita bread and herbs and spices.

    For safety, allow 1–2 days' extra food.

    Opening hours

    The Thorsborne Trail is open 24 hours a day but it can be closed during periods of severe weather (wet and dry) and planned burns. Changes and updates regarding all aspects of the trail are available as park alerts on this site and the booking website. QPWS will ensure all booked hikers are notified of any closures. Please ensure relevant contact details are supplied when booking.

    Pets

    Domestic animals are prohibited on Hinchinbrook Island.

    Climate and weather

    Daytime temperatures and humidity can be high at any time of the year and nights can be very cool. Please carry clothing that is suitable for all temperature extremes.

    Heavy rain can fall at any time of the year, causing creek levels to rise and fall rapidly. Conditions may improve after a short wait. Crossing creeks requires extreme care, particularly at Zoe and Diamantina creeks.

    April to September are the best months for hiking. This period avoids the times of year that are very wet or very dry.

    For more information, see the tourism information links.

    Fuel and supplies

    Fuel and basic supplies are available on the mainland at Cardwell and Lucinda. For more information, see the tourism information links.