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About Hallorans Hill

Park alerts

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Getting there and getting around

Atherton township is 84km from Cairns via the Gillies Highway or 100km via the Kuranda Range. To walk to the summit of Hallorans Hill, follow the track which starts at the council park on Louise Street. To drive, follow the signs from Robert Street or Dalziel Avenue.

Wheelchair accessibility

Hallorans Hill Conservation Park has no wheelchair-accessible facilities. Some wheelchair-accessible facilities are available in the adjacent council park on the summit. For more information, see the tourism information links.

Park features

Enjoy the 1.4km walk to the summit. Photo: Tamara Vallance, Queensland Government

Enjoy the 1.4km walk to the summit. Photo: Tamara Vallance, Queensland Government

Hallorans Hills Conservation Park protects eucalypt forest and a remnant of the endangered mabi forest on an extinct volcanic cone. The cone is part of the legacy of the tableland's fiery geological past.

Enjoy the 1.4km walk to the top of the hill or drive there through suburban Atherton. The expansive views from the summit exhibit the tableland's mosaic of land use and geological formations.

A council park at the summit adjoins the conservation park and provides barbecues, toilets, tables, play equipment, walking track and interpretive signs. For more information see the tourism information links.

Camping and accommodation

Camping

Camping is not permitted in Hallorans Hill Conservation Park.

Other accommodation

There is a range of holiday accommodation in and around Atherton. For more information, see the tourism information links.

Things to do

The walking track travels through mabi forest. Photo: Tamara Vallance, Queensland Government

The walking track travels through mabi forest. Photo: Tamara Vallance, Queensland Government

Hallorans Hill Conservation Park has a high diversity of fauna, including insects like this mayfly. Photo: Tamara Vallance, Queensland Government

Hallorans Hill Conservation Park has a high diversity of fauna, including insects like this mayfly. Photo: Tamara Vallance, Queensland Government

Walking

The walking track in Hallorans Hill Conservation Park can be walked in either direction. It is described here in the uphill direction.

Hallorans Hill walking track Grade: moderate

Distance: 1.4km one way
Time: allow about 40mins walking time
Details: Walk this uphill track to experience eucalypt and near threatened (rare) mabi forest protected by this conservation park. From the council park on Louise Street, the track follows Priors Creek towards the summit. Crossing Twelfth Avenue and Dalziel Street, the track skirts the rim of the crater before ending in the council park at the summit. From the summit, walkers need to arrange for vehicle transport, or return back along the track or through suburban streets. The track is steep in places. At the lower end of the walk, several offshoots from the main track lead to residential streets.

Guided tours and talks

Several tour companies visit Hallorans Hill Conservation Park as part of their tours in the area. For more information, see the tourism information links.

Picnic and day-use areas

Council parks adjoin the conservation park at both ends of the track. The park on Louise Street has toilets, play equipment and tables. The park at the summit has barbecues, toilets, tables, play equipment, walking track and interpretive signs. For more information, see the tourism information links.

Viewing wildlife

For a small park, Hallorans Hill has a high diversity of animals, supported by the changes in vegetation along its length. Insects, amphibians, reptiles, mammals and birds abound in both the rainforest and eucalypt forest.

See the description of the park's natural environment for more details about Hallorans Hill's diverse wildlife.

Things to know before you go

Wear sturdy walking shoes. Photo: Tamara Vallance, Queensland Government

Wear sturdy walking shoes. Photo: Tamara Vallance, Queensland Government

Essentials to bring

To enjoy your time at Hallorans Hill Conservation Park remember to bring:

  • water
  • sun protection
  • sturdy walking shoes.

Opening hours

Hallorans Hill Conservation Park is open 24 hours a day. Parts of the park are occasionally closed for seasonal, planned burns. See park alerts for up-to-date information.

Permits and fees

Special permits are required for commercial or organised group activities. Contact us for further information.

Pets

Domestic animals are not permitted in Hallorans Hill Conservation Park.

Climate and weather

The lower humidity and daytime temperatures at Hallorans Hill Conservation Park are a pleasant escape from the coastal extremes. Maximum summer temperatures for Atherton are around 29ºC while winter temperatures can fall below 10ºC at night. Most of the rain falls during the wet season, between November and March For more information, see the tourism information links.

Fuel and supplies

Fuel and supplies are available in Atherton. For more information, see the tourism information links.

Staying safe

  • Avoid stinging trees. These plants grow to 4m high and have large, heart-shaped leaves with serrated edges. Do not touch these plants as it will result in a very painful sting. If you are stung and symptoms are severe, seek medical advice.
  • Stay on the track and take care on uneven surfaces, especially in wet conditions.
  • Always carry water, wear a hat and sturdy footwear, and try to walk in the cooler part of the day.

For more information, read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

Looking after the park

  • Everything in the park, living or dead, is protected. Please leave everything as you found it.
  • Domestic animals are prohibited in the park.

See the guidelines on caring for parks for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks

Park management

Hallorans Hill was initially declared an environmental park, under the Land Act 1962, in 1989. It became a conservation park in 1994 when the Nature Conservation Act 1992 was enacted. Hallorans Hill Conservation Park is 25.4ha in size.

Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) manages the park to:

  • protect the park's natural condition
  • ensure rare and threatened species are protected
  • provide facilities for minimal impact and nature-based recreation
  • protect the park from overuse
  • concentrate human activity in less sensitive areas
  • help visitors enjoy the park's special attractions.

Tourism information links

Atherton Tablelands Information Centre, Queensland. Photo: Tourism Queensland.

Atherton Tablelands Information Centre, Queensland. Photo: Tourism Queensland.

Atherton Visitor Information Centre
Corner Silo Road and Main Street, Atherton QLD 4883
ph (07) 4091 4222
email

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland see Queensland Holidays.

Further information

Contact us
Last reviewed
26 April 2017
Last updated
11 October 2016