Expedition National Park Capricorn | Outback Queensland

Photo credit: Photo: Robert Ashdown © Qld Govt

Things to do

    This remote park has few or no facilities and visitors should be totally self-sufficient. Photo: Robert Ashdown © Queensland Government

    This remote park has few or no facilities and visitors should be totally self-sufficient. Photo: Robert Ashdown © Queensland Government

    Arcadia Valley lookout, Lonesome section, Expedition National Park. Photos: Robert Ashdown © Queensland Government

    Arcadia Valley lookout, Lonesome section, Expedition National Park. Photos: Robert Ashdown © Queensland Government

    The Shepherds Peak track leads to excellent views over the park.

    The Shepherds Peak track leads to excellent views over the park.

    Discover one of Queensland's remote outback parks through walks, photography or camping.

    Camping and accommodation

    Camping

    Bush camping and camping in designated camping areas is permitted in all three sections of Expedition National Park.

    Camping permits are required and fees apply.

    Note, there is no longer any onsite self-registration available.

    Other accommodation

    There are motels, hotels, caravan parks and farm stays offering accommodation in and around both Injune and Taroom. For more information see the tourism information links.

    Walking

    Walking tracks are provided in Robinson Gorge section of Expedition National Park. There are no walking tracks at Lonesome or Beilba sections.

    Expedition National Park's walking tracks have been classified to help you select a walk that matches your bushwalking experience and fitness. Take time to read the track grades before walking in the park. If you intend to bushwalk away from the tracks described below, obtain a topographic map, compass, Emergency Personal Locator Beacon (PLB) and GPS, and ask for advice before setting off. Ensure you carry adequate drinking water.

    Maps: Robinson Gorge walking tracks map (PDF, 135.1KB)

    Key to track standards

    The classification system is based on Australian Standards. Please note that while each track is graded according to its most difficult section, other sections may be easier.

    Grade 4 walking trackGrade 4 track

    • Rough track. May be long and very steep with few directional signs.
    • For experienced bushwalkers.
    • Caution needed at creek crossings, cliff edges and naturally occurring lookouts.

    Robinson Gorge section

    Tracks in this section are signposted. Most tracks are best suited to experienced, well-equipped bushwalkers while some rough, ungraded walking tracks are suitable for fit family groups.

    DangerDANGER: Unfenced cliff edges. One slip could be fatal—serious injury or death may result from walking near the edge. Keep to the track. Supervise children closely.

    Grade 4 walking trackRobinson Gorge lookout—4km return (allow 1 hour)

    From Starkvale, this track leads to an unfenced lookout over Robinson gorge. There are numerous natural cliffs in the area and parents need to supervise children closely.

    Grade 4 walking trackGorge access track—6km return (allow 2 hours)

    From Starkvale, this track leads to an unfenced lookout over Robinson gorge. There are numerous natural cliffs in the area and creeks can contain deep waterholes with very cold water. Parents need to supervise children closely.

    Grade 4 walking trackShepherds Peak track—3.6km return (allow 1 hour 30 minutes)

    This trail leads 1.8km from Starkvale camping area to a sandstone plateau, Shepherds Peak, with views over the surrounding peaks and creeks. Take extreme care on top of Shepherds Peak as there are crevasses and unguarded cliffs.

    Grade 4 walking trackCattle Dip track—1.2km return (allow 1 hour)

    The cattle dip car park is located 2.7km from the Starkvale Creek campsite via a sign-posted track which passes the location of an old shepherd’s hut (no visible trace remains). Walk 600m south from the car park to the 'Cattle Dip'—a spectacular permanent waterhole.

    Picnic and day-use areas

    The Lonesome section of Expedition National Park has parking, picnic tables, wood barbecues and fire rings. There are no toilets or drinking water in this section.

    Robinson Gorge and Beilba sections have grassed areas surrounding the camping areas that are suitable for picnicking. There are no facilities at Beilba section. Pit toilets are provided at Robinson Gorge. Come prepared with a fuel stove and seating if picnicking in either section. No cooking facilities are provided.

    There are no rubbish bins throughout Expedition National Park, so please take all of your rubbish (including food scraps) with you.

    Viewing wildlife

    Expedition National Park supports a wide variety of birdlife. Listen for the metallic 'chink' of king parrots feeding in the gorge on eucalypt flowers, fruits of cabbage palms, figs and insects. Pale-headed rosellas, lorikeets and many different types of honeyeaters are regularly seen at Starkvale camping area in the Robinson Gorge section. Several species of wallabies including the whiptail wallaby also inhabit the gorge.

    Platypus and five species of turtle use permanent waterholes along the Dawson River. Look for golden-tailed geckoes in the woodlands and thick-tailed geckoes on the roads when venturing out at night.

    Squatter pigeons occur in open woodlands and wallaroos are commonly seen on basalt hills in the middle of the Beilba section.

    • There are currently no park alerts for this park.