Dularcha National Park Sunshine Coast

Photo credit: © Lise Pedersen

Things to do

    Camping and accommodation

    Camping

    Camping is not permitted in Dularcha National Park. Nearby Beerburrum State Forest has a camping area at Coochin Creek.

    Other accommodation

    There is a range of holiday accommodation in the Sunshine Coast Hinterland, including private camping areas on the Glass House Mountains Road—see the tourism information links below for further information.

    Picnic and day-use areas

    Toilets and picnic facilities are not provided in Dularcha National Park. These facilities are available nearby in Landsborough and Mooloolah townships and in Glass House Mountains National Park.

    Cyclists: slow down when entering the tunnel to allow your eyes to adjust to the darker environment! Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    Cyclists: slow down when entering the tunnel to allow your eyes to adjust to the darker environment! Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    Track view, approaching the tunnel from the south on the Tunnel track. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    Track view, approaching the tunnel from the south on the Tunnel track. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    A large-footed myotis bat colony seasonally roosts on the ceiling of the Dularcha tunnel. This image shows just one bat that was on the edge of a group of about 60 bats huddled together on the ceiling. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    A large-footed myotis bat colony seasonally roosts on the ceiling of the Dularcha tunnel. This image shows just one bat that was on the edge of a group of about 60 bats huddled together on the ceiling. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    Take a close look at the Dularcha tunnel walls with a torch and you may find this colourful moth. Spiders and delicate ferns can also be found. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    Take a close look at the Dularcha tunnel walls with a torch and you may find this colourful moth. Spiders and delicate ferns can also be found. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    Spotted pardalote photographed on the Tunnel bypass track, Dularcha National Park. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    Spotted pardalote photographed on the Tunnel bypass track, Dularcha National Park. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

    Walking, horse riding and bike riding

    Three shared trails are provided in Dularcha National Park for shared use by walkers, horse riders and mountain bike riders—the Tunnel track, Tunnel Bypass track and Roses circuit. All other trails marked on the map are for mountain bike riders and walkers only.

    For safety a give-way code applies:

    • Cyclists and walkers give-way to horses
    • When using trails, cyclists must alert others when approaching them.

    Key to track standards

    Walkers—use the walking track standards below to choose a suitable walk for your group. The classification system is based on Australian Standards.

    Grade 2 track

    • Formed track.
    • May have gentle hills and some steps.
    • Clearly signposted, no experience required.

    Grade 3 track

    • Formed track.
    • May have short steep hills and many steps.
    • Some experience recommended.

    Grade 4 track

    • Rough track.
    • May be long and very steep with few directional signs.
    • For experienced bushwalkers.

    Track descriptions

    (Numbers in brackets are map references).

    (1) Tunnel track
    Distance:
    3km one-way. Distance to tunnel 900m one-way (from northern entrance) or 2.1km one-way (from southern entrance)
    Walking track standard—Grade 2
    SEQ Horse Trail Network Standard—Easy
    Mountain biking—Easy

    Details: Take this easy walk to the heritage-listed railway tunnel. Slow down as you enter the tunnel to allow your eyes time to adjust to the darkness—especially important for cyclists!

    Look closely at the tunnel walls and you may find colourful moths, spiders and in wetter areas small ferns. Listen for large-footed myotis bats that seasonally roost here and avoid disturbing them by walking quietly through the tunnel.

    (2) Tunnel bypass track
    Distance:
    220m one-way
    Walking track standard—Grade 4
    SEQ Horse Trail Network Standard—Intermediate
    Mountain biking—Intermediate

    Details: This track passes over the ridge and is designed for visitors with horses that are uncomfortable in the tunnel confines. From this track you can also access the north-eastern section of Roses Circuit—slow down and take care where the tracks meet.

    Please take caution on this section of track as it can be steep, uneven and slippery, especially after wet weather.

    (3) Roses circuit
    Distance:
    8.8km return (from the northern entrance) or 8km return (from the southern entrance)
    Walking track standard—Grade 4
    SEQ Horse trail network standard—Intermediate
    Mountain biking—Intermediate

    Details: This shared trail passes through dry sclerophyll forest and rainforest gullies and includes some views south to the Glass House Mountains.

    Read about the horse riding trail networks in the Caboolture, Bellthorpe, Kenilworth and Mapleton region.

    • There are currently no park alerts for this park.