Diamantina National Park Outback Queensland

Discover Diamantina’s spectacularly diverse and ancient landscape. Photo credit: © Fiona Leverington

Things to do

    Camping and accommodation

    Camping

    Camping is permitted at Hunters Gorge and Gum Hole camping areas. A pit toilet and e-permit camping display are the only facilities provided. Camping permits are required and fees apply.

    Other accommodation

    See the tourism information links for information about accommodation in surrounding towns.

    Hunters Gorge is a great spot to paddle a canoe. Photo courtesy Nella Lithgow.

    Hunters Gorge is a great spot to paddle a canoe. Photo courtesy Nella Lithgow.

    Walking

    When walking, wear sun protection and sturdy shoes, carry plenty of water, and follow other safety advice.

    Warracoota Ruins—400m return (allow 45mins) Grade: easy

    Explore several loose stone-walled structures thought to have been built by early pioneers. The Warracoota Ruins are located 3km west of Warracoota Waterhole along the signed Warracoota Circuit Drive. Follow park signs to a turn-around at the base of a small hill. Park your vehicle here and begin the short walk up-hill at the sign. There is no designated walking track. Please do not try to drive—heritage sites and artefacts are protected.

    Driving

    Please practise low impact driving in Diamantina National Park and remember to bring extra fuel if undertaking this drive.

    Warracoota Circuit Drive—approximately 90km (allow 4-5hrs)

    Follow the self-guided, one-way Warracoota Circuit Drive to explore pastoral relics and learn about the desert landscape and its importance to the Maiawali and Karuwali people. Pick up a copy of the park guide before you go. The park guide provides detailed information about stopping points of interest.

    Janets Leap lookout—approximately 8km return (allow 1hr)

    Visit Janets Leap lookout for a bird’s-eye view of Diamantina Gates, where the many braided channels of the Diamantina River converge and push through a narrow gap between the Hamilton and Goyder ranges. The turn-off to the lookout is signed on the road to Winton—the drive to the lookout is 8km return from here.

    Boating

    Bring your canoe and paddle in the peaceful permanent waterholes and seasonal lakes.

    Viewing wildlife

    Species lists are available from the Queensland Government's request a species list page.

    A yellow-spotted monitor surveys its territory. Photo courtesy Mark Lithgow.

    A yellow-spotted monitor surveys its territory. Photo courtesy Mark Lithgow.

    Crimson turkey bush Eremophila latrobei. Photo courtesy Nella Lithgow.

    Crimson turkey bush Eremophila latrobei. Photo courtesy Nella Lithgow.

    Permanent waterholes are a perfect place to photograph waterbirds at Diamantina. Photo courtesy Mark Lithgow.

    Permanent waterholes are a perfect place to photograph waterbirds at Diamantina. Photo courtesy Mark Lithgow.

    Sandhill puncture vine provides splashes of bright yellow colour in the dunes. Photo courtesy Nella Lithgow.

    Sandhill puncture vine provides splashes of bright yellow colour in the dunes. Photo courtesy Nella Lithgow.

    Animals and birds

    Diamantina's wildlife is highly diverse for arid Queensland, and animals found here include a number of rare and threatened species, including bilbies, kowaris, plains-wanderers, peregrine falcons, and two rare species of skink.

    The park's large permanent waterholes attract many animals and are particularly good for birdwatching at dawn and dusk. While you are travelling around the park, keep an eye out for Hall's babblers, black falcons and oriental plovers.

    Native long-haired rats are noted for periodic population explosions in channel  country following exceptionally good rain or floods. In response, the rat's predators, such as inland taipans, letter-winged kites and eastern grass owls also increase in numbers.

    Plants

    The floodplains, braided channels and waterholes of the Diamantina River and its tributaries are lined with coolibahs, river red gums, lignum, blue bushes and grasses. Beyond the river flats are vast gibber plains and deep, cracking clay soils supporting grasslands dominated by Mitchell grass.

    In the south-west, sandhills and claypans are dominated by cane grass communities, while stark limestone ranges in the park's centre support shrubland and grassland communities that are rare in the region.

    Two rare Eremophila species—rock fuchsia bush and gypsum bush—are found in the park. To date, the gypsum bush has been recorded in only 10 locations on and around Diamantina.

    Trees such as lancewood, mountain yapunyah, Normanton box, red mallee and myall, although more typically found in greater numbers in other climatic regions, are also found here.

    Other things to do

    Photography

    Capture Diamantina’s rich desert colours, diverse wildlife and beautiful flower displays as a souvenir of your visit.

    Discovering cultural heritage

    Diamantina National Park contains several sites of cultural significance and is particularly rich in Indigenous habitation and spiritual sites. Remnants of settler history include the remains of Mayne Hotel, which closed in 1951 (located just near the eastern park boundary), stone hut ruins near Warracoota Waterhole and cemeteries. The 20 registered graves recorded in the park date from 1884 to 1944.

    Displays in the visitor information room at the old homestead explain more about the park’s heritage.

    Please remember, heritage sites and artefacts are protected. Leave everything as you find it.

    • There are currently no park alerts for this park.