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About Daisy Hill

Getting there and getting around

Daisy Hill Conservation Park is only 25km south-east of Brisbane City. Photo: Jodie Bray, Queensland Government.

Daisy Hill Conservation Park is only 25km south-east of Brisbane City. Photo: Jodie Bray, Queensland Government.

Daisy Hill day-use area features a Disability Discrimination Act compliant track along which compliant picnic tables, barbecues and toilets are available. Photo: Jodie Bray, Queensland Government.

Daisy Hill day-use area features a Disability Discrimination Act compliant track along which compliant picnic tables, barbecues and toilets are available. Photo: Jodie Bray, Queensland Government.

Daisy Hill Conservation Park is easily accessed from Brisbane or the Gold Coast via the Pacific Motorway (M1). From the Gold Coast, travel north along the Pacific Motorway and take exit 24. Travelling south from Brisbane along the Pacific Motorway (M3 then the M1), take exit 23 toward Chatswood Road. Follow the signs to Daisy Hill Road and the entrance to the park. The Daisy Hill day-use area and the trail hub are both accessible with conventional vehicles.

Walkers, mountain-bike riders and horseriders can access the park’s shared trail network via a number of gates around the park boundary. See the Koala Bushland Coordinated Conservation Area (KBCCA) map (including Daisy Hill Conservation Park) (PDF, 440K) for details.

Wheelchair accessibility

Car park one in the Daisy Hill day-use area has parking for people with wheelchairs. This car park is the start of a Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (DDA) compliant track, along which compliant picnic tables, barbecues and toilets are available. The Daisy Hill Koala Centre is also accessible to wheelchairs (some assistance may be required) from car park one.

The Paperbark trail is a walking trail suitable for wheelchairs; some assistance may be required for the boardwalk section of the trail. It starts in the Daisy Hill day-use area and is accessible from the DDA compliant track.

Park features

Come face-to-face with koalas at the Daisy Hill Koala Centre. Photo: Visible Focus, Queensland Government.

Come face-to-face with koalas at the Daisy Hill Koala Centre. Photo: Visible Focus, Queensland Government.

Take the family for a ride along one of the mountain biking trail or on the shared trail network. Photo: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government.

Take the family for a ride along one of the mountain biking trail or on the shared trail network. Photo: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government.

Horseriders, mountain bikers and walkers can enjoy the network of shared trails in the park. Photo: Queensland Government.

Horseriders, mountain bikers and walkers can enjoy the network of shared trails in the park. Photo: Queensland Government.

Nestled between Brisbane and the Gold Coast, Daisy Hill Conservation Park is part of the Koala Bushland Coordinated Conservation Area (KBCCA)—a forested oasis surrounded by urban development. The area protects important koala habitat while also being one of South East Queensland’s most significant recreation hubs.

Escape the city to walk, mountain bike and horseride through tall eucalypt forest and sun-dappled melaleuca wetlands. A world-class recreational trail network allows you to explore vibrant bushland in every direction. Enjoy a barbecue lunch in one of the shady picnic areas with open grassy spaces to run wild. If you’re lucky, you’ll spot one of the resident red-necked wallabies. For more wildlife spotting, head to the Daisy Hill Koala Centre for a free, up-close encounter with live koalas and tree-top views from the tower. Interactive displays and educational talks by Wildlife Officers are features of the centre.

Camping and accommodation

Camping

To protect the natural values of Daisy Hill Conservation Park, camping is not permitted.

Other accommodation

There is a range of holiday accommodation available in and around Brisbane and the Gold Coast. For more information see the tourism information links.

Things to do

Daisy Hill has single-use walking trails and a network of shared trails for walkers to enjoy. Photo: Lise Pedersen.

Daisy Hill has single-use walking trails and a network of shared trails for walkers to enjoy. Photo: Lise Pedersen.

Enjoy horseriding along any of the shared trails. Photo: Monique Shepherd, Queensland Government.

Enjoy horseriding along any of the shared trails. Photo: Monique Shepherd, Queensland Government.

Ride along one of the designated mountain-bike or shared trails. Photo: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government.

Ride along one of the designated mountain-bike or shared trails. Photo: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government.

Picnics or barbecues can be enjoyed under the gum trees in the Daisy Hill picnic area or the Daisy Hill trail hub. Photo: Jodie Bray, Queensland Government.

Picnics or barbecues can be enjoyed under the gum trees in the Daisy Hill picnic area or the Daisy Hill trail hub. Photo: Jodie Bray, Queensland Government.

The kids will love the Wild Nature Play opportunities in the day-use area. Photo: Jodie Bray, Queensland Government.

The kids will love the Wild Nature Play opportunities in the day-use area. Photo: Jodie Bray, Queensland Government.

Get out and explore Daisy Hill and the KBCCA your way! With an extensive network of recreational trails you can spin the wheels of your mountain bike, ride on horseback or stretch your legs with a bushwalk. Some trails are designated as single-use specifically for walkers or mountain-bike riders, while others are shared trails and open to walkers, mountain-bike riders and horseriders. Check out the Koala Bushland Coordinated Conservation Area (KBCCA) map (including Daisy Hill Conservation Park) (PDF, 440K) for details.

Walking

Daisy Hill Conservation Park offers the chance to explore tall eucalypt forests, melaleuca wetlands and the billabongs along Buhot Creek.

There are two designated single-use walking trails in the park. Walking is also permitted on all management roads and shared trails in Daisy Hill Conservation Park and the greater Koala Bushland Coordinated Conservation Area (KBCCA), unless otherwise signed.

Visitors can enjoy bushwalking with their dogs on shared trails only (dogs are not permitted on the mountain bike only trails). Dogs must be kept on a leash at all times.

Key to walking trail standards

The classification system is based on Australian Standards. Please note that while each trail is classified according to its most difficult section, other sections may be easier.

Class 1 walking trackClass 1

  • No bushwalking experience required.
  • Flat, even surface with no steps or steep sections, 5km or less.
  • Clearly signposted.
  • Suitable for wheelchairs with assistance.

Class 2 walking trackClass 2

  • Formed track. May have gentle hills and some steps.
  • Clearly signposted.
  • No bushwalking experience required.

Class 3 walking trackClass 3

  • Formed track, some obstacles, 20km or less.
  • May have short steep hills and many steps.
  • Some experience recommended.

Class 4 walking trackClass 4

  • Distinct track usually with steep exposed inclines or many steps, loose gravel surfaces and exposed natural outlooks.
  • Moderate level of fitness and bushwalking experience recommended.

Walking trails (mountain bikes and horses prohibited)

Trail Classification Distance Time Description
Paperbark trail

Class 1 walking trackClass 1

450m Allow 15min Suitable for wheelchairs with some assistance, this Disability Discrimination Act compliant trail and boardwalk starts near car park three in the Daisy Hill day-use area. It winds through cool melaleuca wetlands fed by a natural spring. Stop to read the interpretive signs along the way to find out why melaleucas are marvellous!
Tree discovery trail

Class 2 walking trackClass 2

800m Allow 30min Eucalypts are extraordinary! Find out why on this self-guided trail that starts near car park four in the Daisy Hill day-use area and winds through open eucalypt forest.

See the shared trails table below for other walking options.

Mountain-bike riding and horseriding

For those looking for two-wheeled adventure, Daisy Hill and the greater KBCCA has kilometres of premier recreational trails. The mountain-bike only trails are built to international standards, offering a good mix of levels for all riders. Explore hillsides of eucalypt forest on an easy, early morning ride or challenge yourself with berms on tight corners and rock features. The KBCCA’s shared trails are wider and easier to ride.

Horseriders can also explore the natural surrounds of the KBCCA on the network of shared recreational trails. These well-maintained trails cater for riders of easy to moderate experience, with rides ranging from a few hundred metres to many kilometres if you combine trails. Enjoy a relaxed, meandering ride through the area’s magnificent bushland, keeping an eye out for snoozing koalas in the branches above. Settle into the saddle with nothing but you, your horse and the wildlife around you.

Mountain-bike riding and horseriding are permitted on all management roads and most shared trails in Daisy Hill Conservation Park and the greater KBCCA, unless otherwise signed. Each trail entry has a sign indicating which recreational activities are permitted.

Permits are not required for horseriding or mountain-bike riding in Daisy Hill Conservation Park.

Mountain-bike and horseriding trail classifications

Mountain-bike trail classification descriptions
Class Description
Easy mountain bike trailEasy

For beginner mountain bikers with basic mountain-bike skills. Wide trail, gentle gradient, some obstacles.

Intermediate mountain bike trailIntermediate

For skilled mountain bikers. Moderate gradient, obstacles and some steep sections.

Difficult mountain bike trailDifficult

For experienced mountain bikers. Challenging trail. Large, unavoidable obstacles and features. Long steep climbs or descents and loose surfaces.

Horseriding trail classification descriptions
Class Description
Class 1 easy horseriding trailClass 1 Easy

For novice riders and experienced horses with basic skills and fitness. Wide trail, natural, surface, gentle slope.

Class 2 intermediate horseriding trailClass 2 Intermediate

For experienced riders and horses with moderate skills and fitness. Variable trail, moderate slope, some obstacles.

Mountain-bike only trails in the KBCCA (horses, walkers and dogs prohibited)
Trail Classification Distance Time Description
1. Possum Box trail Intermediate mountain bike trailIntermediate 2.2km Allow 10mins Best ridden from the five ways junction, but can be ridden in both directions.
2. Chipline trail

Intermediate mountain bike trailIntermediate

680m Allow 5mins

Can be ridden both directions but is a downhill run from the five ways junction. There is a challenging rock garden 200m in from the top of the trail.

3. Lace monitor trail Intermediate mountain bike trailIntermediate 2.5km Allow 10mins Can be ridden in both directions, preferred direction of travel is east to west. A sweeping trail with technical features.
9. Jim Finch trail Intermediate mountain bike trailIntermediate 565m Allow 5mins A short trail link from the southern boundary.
11. Gillians trail Intermediate mountain bike trailIntermediate 530m Allow 5mins A short trail link from the Glossy black trail to the Ripleys and Gilder shared-use trails.
12. Glossy black trail Easy mountain bike trailEasy 690m one way Allow 5 to 10min Can be ridden in both directions. A short trail that links two sections of the Stringybark trail, avoiding a steep section of the trail.
14. Jumping ant trail Intermediate mountain bike trailIntermediate 1.4km Allow 7mins Best ridden from the five ways junction, but can be ridden in both directions.
Shared trails in the KBCCA (walkers, horseriders and mountain-bike riders permitted)
Trail Classification Distance Time Description
Buhot Creek circuit

Class 3 walking trackClass 3

Intermediate mountain bike trailIntermediate

Class 2 intermediate horseriding trailIntermediate

9km Allow 5.5hrs to walk or 2hrs to ride This trail starts from the Daisy Hill trail hub and allows visitors to explore Daisy Hill Conservation Park and adjoining Neville Lawrie Reserve. Take time by tranquil waterholes and enjoy views from the old quarry.

Plunkett mallee circuit

Class 2 walking trackClass 2

Intermediate mountain bike trailIntermediate

Class 1 easy horseriding trailEasy

2.54km Allow 30mins to walk or 15mins to ride This circuit features a stand of Plunkett mallee Eucalyptus curtisii, a near threatened tree within the Redland City Council area that flowers prolifically from September to November.

Spotted gum circuit

Class 3 walking trackClass 3

Intermediate mountain bike trailIntermediate

Class 1 easy horseriding trailEasy

5.2km Allow 2.5hrs to walk or 50mins to ride Branching off the Buhot Creek circuit, this circuit trail follows a gently undulating ridgeline through eucalypt forest dominated by spotted gums.

Stringybark circuit

Class 3 walking trackClass 3

Intermediate mountain bike trailIntermediate

Class 2 intermediate horseriding trailIntermediate

5.7km Allow 3.5hrs to walk or 1hr to ride This trail starts from the Daisy Hill trail hub and meanders through the various plant communities within the Buhot Creek catchment. Red-necked wallabies, swamp wallabies and various birds may be seen along the way.

4. Ripleys trail

Class 3 walking trackClass 3

Intermediate mountain bike trailIntermediate

Class 2 intermediate horseriding trailIntermediate

2.2km Allow 30 to 40min to walk or 15mins to ride This trail climbs to an elevated ridge with numerous downhill opportunities.

5. Koala trail

Class 3 walking trackClass 3

Intermediate mountain bike trailIntermediate

Class 2 intermediate horseriding trailIntermediate

1.1km Allow 15mins to walk or 5mins to ride This trail is an extension of the Chipline trail (2).

10. Glider trail

Class 3 walking trackClass 3

Intermediate mountain bike trailIntermediate

Class 2 intermediate horseriding trailIntermediate

2.3km Allow 30 to 40mins to walk or 15mins to ride The Glider trail branches off the Buhot Creek circuit in Neville Lawrie Reserve and offers mountain-bike riders an extension to Gillians trail.

13. Sleepy hollow trail

Class 3 walking trackClass 3

Intermediate mountain bike trailIntermediate

Class 2 intermediate horseriding trailIntermediate

350m Allow 5mins to walk or 2mins to ride Very short trail branching off the Buhot Creek circuit into Don and Christine Burnett Conservation Area.

Walking and mountain biking shared trails in the KBCCA (horseriders prohibited)

Trail Classification Distance Time Description
6. Wiry panic trail

Class 3 walking trackClass 3

Intermediate mountain bike trailIntermediate

 1.6km

Allow 40mins to walk or 10mins to ride

Best ridden from north to south to make the most of the downhill run.
7. Grasstree East trail

Class 3 walking trackClass 3

Intermediate mountain bike trailIntermediate

 860m

Allow 20mins to walk or 7mins to ride

Grasstree East trail is a linking trail between sections of the Plunkett Mallee circuit in Neville Lawrie Reserve and Don and Christine Burnett Conservation Area.
15. Grasstree West trail

Class 3 walking trackClass 3

Intermediate mountain bike trailIntermediate

 830m

Allow 20mins to walk or 7mins to ride

Grasstree Wast trail is a linking trail between sections of the Plunkett Mallee circuit in Don and Christine Burnett Conservation Area.
8. Nirvana trail

Class 4 walking trackClass 4

Difficult mountain bike trailDifficult

1.9km one way

Allow 1hr to walk or 25mins to ride

To get the best of this trail ride from east to west.

Ride safely

We want you to get the best out of your ride.

  • Always wear a helmet.
  • Plan ahead, ride within your ability and according to trail conditions.
  • Slow down or stop when approaching other trail users. Follow the give-way code.
  • Slow down when riding over water bars (whoa-boys) on shared trails—excess speed can cause loss of control and may result in injury.
  • Avoid riding in large groups—keep groups to fewer than 12.
  • Avoid skidding and sliding around turns—this causes trail damage and may result in a collision with other trail users.
  • Avoid riding during and after rain when tracks are soft, wet and muddy.
  • Stay on marked trails—riding over vegetation, taking shortcuts and forming new trails damages plants and wildlife habitat.
  • Respect areas closed to riding.
Give way signFollow the give-way code
  • Cyclists must give way to walkers and horseriders, and alert others when approaching them.
  • Walkers must give way to horses.

Picnic areas

Daisy Hill day-use area and Daisy Hill trail hub

Picnics or barbecues can be enjoyed under the gum trees in the Daisy Hill day-use area or the Daisy Hill trail hub. If you’re lucky, you’ll be joined by the resident red-necked wallabies as they graze the open grassy spaces.

The Daisy Hill day-use area is set in grassy open forest and can be accessed via a sealed ring road. There is parking for cars and buses. Picnic tables, wood and electric barbecues, toilets, shelter sheds and water (treat before drinking). Suitable access for wheelchairs and strollers is provided along the Disability Discrimination Act compliant track which features compliant picnic tables, barbecues and toilets.

The Daisy Hill trail hub is smaller and popular with mountain-bike riders. It can be accessed by turning right before the main gates. Picnic tables, wood barbecues, toilets, a horse yard and drinking trough are provided. The trail hub facilities also include a water station, gathering area, warm up track and mountain bike service area.

No bins are provided at Daisy Hill Conservation Park so please take your rubbish home.

Nature Play

Daisy Hill Conservation Park is a great place to get your kids into Nature Play—outdoor, free play. The day-use area features two options—Wild Nature Play and Indigenous Games—to engage your kids with the nature around them. The whole family will enjoy the wooden animal carvings and the interactive audio wheel! Find out more at www.natureplayqld.org.au.

Daisy Hill Koala Centre

Daisy Hill Koala Centre is a free Koala education facility, where you can meet koalas and learn about conservation through the interactive displays and Wildlife Officer talks. The treetop tower lets visitors experience a koala’s eye view and look for koalas in the trees of the surrounding forest. The centre is open 7 days a week from 9.00am to 4.00pm (except Christmas Day, New Year’s Day and Good Friday).

Viewing wildlife

The eucalypt forest of Daisy Hill Conservation Park is dominated by spotted gum, grey gum, ironbark, tallowwood and stringybark trees. It provides a habitat for a wide range of wildlife including koalas, possums, wallabies, birds and reptiles.

Throughout the day-use area and along the trails visitors may be lucky enough to spot a sleeping koala in the treetops.

While enjoying a picnic, pied butcherbirds, pied currawongs, Australian magpies, sulphur-crested cockatoos and laughing kookaburras can be seen and the distinctive 'whip' call of the eastern whipbird is often heard.

During the warmer months (October to March) the loud 'cooee' of the common koel and the raucous call of the channel-billed cuckoo echo through the forest.

Fantails and fairy-wrens are common along the walking trails and sacred kingfishers and eastern water dragons occur near creeks and waterholes. Late in the afternoons, red-necked wallabies and swamp wallabies can be seen in the day-use areas.

See the description of the park’s natural environment for more details about Daisy Hill Conservation Park's local koala population and other wildlife species.

Things to know before you go

Keep dogs on a leash at all times and walk them on shared trails only. Photo: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government.

Keep dogs on a leash at all times and walk them on shared trails only. Photo: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government.

Essentials to bring

  • Rubbish bags to take rubbish home—no bins are provided.
  • Protective clothing, a hat, sunscreen and insect repellent, for protection from the sun and biting insects.
  • Sturdy shoes for walking or riding.
  • Binoculars to help spot koalas and other wildlife.

Opening hours

Daisy Hill Conservation Park has entry and exit gates which are locked each evening.

Between 15 March and 14 October the gates are open from 7.00am to 5.30pm. For the rest of the year the gates are open from 7.00am to 6.30pm.

The Daisy Hill Koala Centre is open daily from 9.00am to 4.00pm, except Christmas Day, New Year’s Day and Good Friday. Contact the centre on other public holidays to check if it is open.

Permits and fees

A permit is not required to recreate within the park unless the activity is a commercial activity or organised event (including competitive and sporting events). All commercial activities require a permit and some organised and/or group activities require a permit.

Pets

Dogs are permitted in Daisy Hill Conservation Park on shared trails only. They must be on a leash at all times.

Climate and weather

Brisbane has a mild, subtropical climate. In summer the average daily temperature range is 22 to 30°C and 12 to 22°C in winter.

For more information see the tourism information links. Weather forecasts are available from the Bureau of Meteorology.

Fuel and supplies

Fuel and supplies are available in the suburb of Daisy Hill and throughout Brisbane.

Staying safe

Emergency markers are located at all trail junctions throughout the park.

Emergency markers are located at all trail junctions throughout the park.

Please take notice of the markers in case of an emergency. Knowing your location will save valuable time if you require assistance from emergency services. Photo: Jess Rosewell, Queensland Government.

Please take notice of the markers in case of an emergency. Knowing your location will save valuable time if you require assistance from emergency services. Photo: Jess Rosewell, Queensland Government.

Take a map with you to avoid getting lost. Photo: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government.

Take a map with you to avoid getting lost. Photo: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government.

Emergency markers (unique alphanumeric codes) are located:

  • at formalised park entrances
  • on shared trails, and
  • at management road junctions.

In an emergency dial Triple Zero (000) and if possible, recite the closest emergency marker code to assist emergency services (Police, Fire and Ambulance) in locating the emergency within the conservation park.

Follow these general safety tips to ensure your visit is memorable for the right reasons:

  • Take care when using barbecues. Only use wood provided within the wood barbecue facilities and put the fire out with water. Supervise children to avoid burn injuries. Observe fire bans and prohibitions.
  • Stay on the trails and follow signs to avoid getting lost. We recommend taking a photo of the trail network from the orientation signs at trailheads before you head out.
  • Carry water, food, a first-aid kit, mobile phone and a map when walking, especially on longer walks.
  • Always let a responsible person know where you are going and when you expect to return.
  • Wear a hat and sunscreen and avoid walking and riding in the middle of the day.
  • Wear insect repellent to help prevent tick and other insect bites or stings.
  • Do not disturb snakes—give them space and wait for them to move on. Some snakes are dangerous. If bitten, seek medical attention immediately.
  • Keep away from creek banks; they may collapse under foot.
  • Never jump or dive into water—it may be shallow or hide submerged obstructions.
  • Be aware that trails can be slippery, especially after rain.
  • Obey signs and regulations—they are in place to protect you and the park.
  • Reduce theft by removing valuables from your vehicle and taking them with you.

For more information, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

Looking after the park

Let animals find their own food. Photo: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government.

Let animals find their own food. Photo: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government.

You can help protect the park and forest by observing these guidelines:

  • Do not take or disturb plants or animals. Everything in the park is protected.
  • Stay on the designated trails. Shortcutting causes erosion, damages vegetation and can potentially result in injury.
  • Remove all rubbish. No bins are provided.
  • Dogs must be on leashes at all times and on designated shared trails only.
  • Let animals find their own food. Human food can make native animals susceptible to disease, and can cause overpopulation and aggressive behaviour.
  • Show consideration for other park users and keep noise to a minimum.

See caring for parks for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks.

Park management

Daisy Hill is part of an area that protects the most intact natural koala habitat between Brisbane and the Gold Coast. Photo: Maxime Coquard, Queensland Government.

Daisy Hill is part of an area that protects the most intact natural koala habitat between Brisbane and the Gold Coast. Photo: Maxime Coquard, Queensland Government.

Daisy Hill Conservation Park was gazetted as a conservation park in 2006. Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) manages this area for the purposes of nature conservation and sustainable nature-based recreation.

Daisy Hill Conservation Park is part of Queensland’s first coordinated conservation area—the Koala Bushland Coordinated Conservation Area (KBCCA). Born from a common concern to protect the area’s natural values, the Queensland Government, Logan City Council and Redland City Council forged a long-term conservation agreement in 1996, creating the KBCCA, The conservation area links Daisy Hill Conservation Park, Venman Bushland National Park and local council areas (Neville Lawrie Reserve, Don and Christine Burnett Conservation Area and Ford Road Conservation Area) to provide a combined area of over 1500ha of natural bushland. This area protects one of the most intact natural koala habitats between Brisbane and the Gold Coast.

The Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service, Logan City Council and Redland City Council work together to protect and cooperatively manage the KBCCA to:

  • protect koalas and their habitat
  • protect freshwater stream plant and animal communities
  • keep bushland catchments clean
  • provide opportunities for environmentally compatible and sustainable, nature-based recreation and education.

Tourism information links

Brisbane Visitor Information and Booking Centre
www.visitbrisbane.com.au
The Regent, 167 Queen Street Mall (between Albert and Edward streets), Brisbane QLD 4002
ph (07) 3006 6200
email:

South Bank Visitor Centre
www.visitbrisbane.com.au
Stanley Street Plaza, South Bank Parklands
ph (07) 3156 6366
email:

Redlands Visitor Information Centre
IndigiScapes, 17 Runnymede Rd, Capalaba
ph (07) 1300 667 386
email:

Hyperdome Visitor Information Centre
Cnr Pacific Highway and Bryants Rd, Loganholme
ph (07) 3281 0555
email:

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland see Queensland Holidays.

Further information

Contact us

Daisy Hill Koala Centre
253 Daisy Hill Road, Daisy Hill PO Box 5116, Daisy Hill Qld 4127
ph (07) 3078 3102
International +61 7 3078 3102
email:

Open 9.00am to 4.00pm daily (except Christmas Day, New Year's Day and Good Friday).

Last updated
28 March 2018