Mount Sorrow ridge trail, Daintree National Park Tropical North Queensland

The Mount Sorrow Ridge trail is a difficult climb through dense rainforest, but the views are worth it! Photo credit: © Steven Nowakowski

Visiting Mount Sorrow safely

    Getting there and getting around

    The Mount Sorrow ridge trail is in Cape Tribulation, Daintree National Park. Travel 104 kilometres north of Cairns via the Captain Cook Highway to the Daintree River crossing. The ferry operates 6.00 am to midnight every day except Christmas Day and Good Friday, with occasional breaks in service for extreme floods or mechanical repairs. Fees apply for the ferry crossing.

    Beyond the ferry, travel about 36 kilometres to the Kulki day-use area at Cape Tribulation. Conventional vehicle access is possible. The road is narrow and winding. Towing a caravan is not recommended.

    Park your vehicle at the Kulki day-use area and walk 150 metres north along the Cape Tribulation – Bloomfield Road to a gravel pull-off area. The signposted start of the trail is directly opposite this pull-off area.

    The unsealed road north from Cape Tribulation to Bloomfield is only suitable for four-wheel-drive vehicles due to steep grades and creek crossings. Drive slowly and keep watch for wildlife crossing the road.

    Contact the RACQ to enquire about local road conditions.

    Wheelchair accessibility

    The Mount Sorrow ridge trail is not wheelchair accessible.

    Staying safe

    The Mount Sorrow ridge trail is difficult, and conditions such as weather can change quickly and unpredictably. Walkers must be well prepared and responsible for their own safety. Contact QPWS Mossman office for trail conditions. Consider your ability and the trail conditions carefully before setting out.

    • This trail should only be attempted in daylight hours. Start this walk early in the morning to beat the heat and allow enough time to safely return before nightfall.
    • Tell a responsible person where you are going and when you expect to return. Remember to contact them on your safe return. Have a contingency plan in place if you fail to contact them by the agreed time. If you change your plans, inform them.
    • Walking this trail is not recommended in very hot and humid conditions or wet, cloudy weather when the trail becomes slippery.
    • Always keep to the marked trail as walkers have been lost in this area.
    • This is a very steep and difficult trail. Walkers need to be fit, self-reliant and well prepared.
    • Never walk alone. Small groups of four are ideal.
    • Do not pull yourself up steep sections of the trail using vegetation, as plants may be damaged and it can be dangerous if the vine/vegetation pulls free and you fall or pull vegetation or dead branches down on yourself.
    • There is no water available along the trail. Walkers should carry 3–4 litres of water per person and remember to drink regularly to avoid heat stress.
    • Venomous snakes live in the park. Detour around snakes. Never provoke them.
    • Leeches are usually present in leaf litter and wet vegetation. For protection against leeches wear enclosed footwear, long pants and insect repellent.
    • Protect yourself from the sun. Wear sunscreen, a hat, sunglasses and a long-sleeved shirt, even on cloudy days.
    • Be aware that lawyer vine is found alongside the trail. This plant has hooks that can catch on clothing and skin.
    • Take care around cassowaries. These large birds are potentially dangerous. Stay well away from any cassowaries sighted and never feed them. Be Cass-o-wary.
    • Read be wildlife aware for important information about dangerous animals and plants.
    • In the event of an emergency, communication equipment is vital. Carry at least one form of communication equipment. Satellite phones and emergency position indicating radio beacons (EPIRBs) are the most effective. Mobile phone coverage is extremely limited and should not be relied upon as the only form of emergency communication. In case of an emergency, if network coverage is available, dial 000 on your charged mobile phone. If 000 does not work you can dial 112.

    For more information, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

    Before you visit

    To ensure that you have a safe and enjoyable walk, please prepare thoroughly.

    Tell a responsible person where you are going and when you expect to return. Remember to contact them on your safe return. Have a contingency plan in place if you fail to contact them by the agreed time. If you change your plans, inform them.

    Essentials to bring

    The Mount Sorrow ridge trail is difficult and walkers need to be well prepared. Walkers must be fully self-sufficient and ensure they pack the right equipment. Make sure that you take:

    • a basic first-aid kit including a space blanket
    • warm, waterproof clothing
    • sturdy, reliable footwear
    • insect repellent
    • at least 3–4 litres of water per person
    • nourishing, lightweight food and high-energy snacks
    • satellite phone or emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Opening hours

    The Mount Sorrow ridge trail should only be attempted in daylight hours—plan your walk so that you return well before nightfall. Walking this trail is not recommended in very hot and humid conditions or wet, cloudy weather when the trail becomes slippery. Contact QPWS Mossman office for trail conditions.

    Permits and fees

    No permits or fees apply to visitors walking the Mount Sorrow ridge trail.

    Camping permits are required and fees apply for Noah Beach campground, about eight kilometres south of Mount Sorrow.

    Pets

    Domestic animals are not permitted in Daintree National Park.

    Climate and weather

    The area in which this trail is located has one of the wettest climates in Australia. During the wet season, from November to April, there are heavy, frequent downpours. Some areas receive over four metres of rainfall annually. Maximum temperatures through the wet season range from 27 to 33 degrees Celsius, with humidity often exceeding 80 per cent.

    To ensure your visit is enjoyable and comfortable, try to do this trail between May and October when the weather and trail conditions are at their best. During this time the temperatures are generally cooler and the weather drier.

    Fuel and supplies

    Fuel and supplies are available at Rainforest Village, 14 kilometres north of the Daintree River ferry. For more information see the tourism information links below.

    • There are currently no park alerts for this park.