Manjal Jimalji trail, Daintree National Park Tropical North Queensland

Visiting Manjal Jimalji trail safely

    Getting there and getting around

    Manjal Jimalji trail is located in Mossman Gorge, Daintree National Park. The trail begins in the Whyanbeel Valley at Little Falls Creek about 17km north of Mossman, which is 80km north of Cairns along the Captain Cook Highway.

    From Mossman, travel north on the Mossman–Daintree Road. About 8km north of Mossman the Mossman–Daintree Road veers to the right while Miallo Road continues straight ahead. Follow Miallo Road for 3km then turn left into Whyanbeel Road. Travel a further 4km, crossing the bridge over Whyanbeel Creek, and take the second road on the left towards the Karnak Playhouse. Continue past the Karnak Playhouse until you cross a cattle grid. After crossing the grid, park your car off the road. Follow the walking track, indicated by orange markers and directional signs, for 700m to the start of the Manjal Jimalji trail. Remember, some of this land is private property so be respectful by staying on designated roads and walking tracks.

    Wheelchair accessibility

    The Manjal Jimalji trail is not wheelchair accessible.

    Staying safe

    The Manjal Jimalji trail is difficult, and conditions such as weather can change quickly and unpredictably. You need a high level of fitness, sound navigation skills and self reliance; you are responsible for your own safety. Consider your ability and the trail conditions carefully before setting out. Contact the Mossman office for details of current trail conditions.

    It is important to stay on the walking trail at all times—serious injuries have occurred in this area as a result of walkers leaving the designated trail. Your safety is our concern, but your responsibility.

    • This trail should only be attempted in daylight hours—start this walk early in the morning to beat the heat and allow enough time to safely return before nightfall.
    • Never walk alone—small groups of four are ideal. Always keep to the marked trail as walkers have been lost in this area.
    • Carry adequate drinking water—no water is available along the trail.
    • Carry a map and compass.
    • Carry at least one form of communication equipment. Satellite phones and emergency position indicating radio beacons (EPIRBs) are the most effective. Mobile phone coverage is unreliable.
    • Walking this trail is not recommended in very hot and humid conditions or wet, cloudy weather when the trail becomes slippery.
    • Wear boots or strong shoes.
    • Do not pull yourself up steep sections of the trail using vegetation, as plants may be damaged and it can be dangerous if the vine/vegetation pulls free and you fall or pull vegetation or dead branches down on yourself.
    • Stay on the walking trail at all times—this reduces the risk of injury, prevents disturbance to native vegetation and reduces erosion.
    • Wear insect repellent, clothing and shoes to protect yourself from stings, scratches and bites.
    • Protect yourself from the sun. Wear sunscreen, a hat, sunglasses and a long-sleeved shirt, even on cloudy days.
    • Take waterproof clothing as it is often wet, windy and cold near the summit.
    • Carry a first-aid kit and know how to use it.
    • Detour around snakes. Never provoke them.
    • Read be wildlife aware for important information about dangerous animals and plants.
    • Cassowaries live in this area. Never approach or feed these animals and remember to be Cass-O-Wary.

    For more information, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

    Before you visit

    The Manjal Jimalji trail is isolated and help can be hours away. You must be responsible for your own safety and be well prepared. Remember to tell a responsible person where you are going and when you expect to return. Don't forget to contact them on your safe return. Have a contingency plan in place if you fail to contact them by the agreed time. If you change your plans, inform them. The Department of National Parks, Sport and Racing is not responsible for ensuring the safe return of walkers.

    Essentials to bring

    • a basic first-aid kit (including a space blanket)
    • waterproof clothing as it is often wet, windy and cold near the summit
    • boots or strong shoes
    • adequate drinking water—no water is available along the trail
    • a map and a compass
    • sunscreen, a hat, sunglasses and insect repellent
    • at least one form of communication equipment. Satellite phones and emergency position indicating radio beacons (EPIRBs) are the most effective. Mobile phone coverage is unreliable.

    Opening hours

    The Manjal Jimalji trail should only be attempted in daylight hours—plan your walk so that you return before nightfall. Walking this trail is not recommended in very hot and humid conditions or wet, cloudy weather when the trail becomes slippery. Contact the Mossman office for details of current trail conditions.

    Permits and fees

    No permits or fees apply to visitors walking the Manjal Jimalji trail.

    Pets

    Pets are not permitted in Daintree National Park.

    Climate and weather

    The area in which Daintree National Park is located has one of the wettest climates in Australia. During the wet season, from December to April, there are frequent heavy downpours. Some areas receive over 6 m of rainfall annually. Maximum temperatures through the wet season range from 27 to 33°C, with humidity often exceeding 80 per cent.

    The cooler, drier months from May to November are the best time to visit. The weather is pleasantly warm during this time, with reduced humidity and the maximum temperature averaging 26°C.

    Walking this trail is not recommended in very hot and humid conditions or wet, cloudy weather when the trail becomes slippery. Weather forecasts are available from the Bureau of Meteorology.

    Fuel and supplies

    Fuel and supplies are available at various locations at Cairns, Port Douglas and Mossman.

    • There are currently no park alerts for this park.