Cordalba State Forest Bundaberg

Mountain bike riders on the Joey trail, Cordalba State Forest. Photo credit: ©️ John Gatley

Things to do

    Camping and accommodation

    Camping

    There is no formal camping area at Cordalba State Forest. The mountain bike trailhead areas are day-use areas only, camping is not permitted in them.

    Bush camping is allowed in the forest. No facilities are provided so visitors must be totally self-sufficient.

    Camping permits are required and fees apply. A tag with your booking number must be displayed at your camp site.

    Other accommodation

    There is a range of holiday accommodation in and around Bundaberg and Childers.
    For more information see the tourism information links.

    Walking

    When walking along forest roads always walk facing the oncoming traffic and look out for other road users. Photo: Cathy Gatley.

    When walking along forest roads always walk facing the oncoming traffic and look out for other road users. Photo: Cathy Gatley.

    Walking is permitted on all management roads and trails in Cordalba State Forest unless otherwise signed.

    Remote bushwalking in Cordalba State Forest requires special skills.

    Bushwalkers must:

    • plan well
    • be physically fit, have bushwalking and navigation experience.
    • prepare an emergency plan. Leave details with a responsible friend or family member so they can take action if needed. Remember to let them know if you change your plans!
    • carry good communication equipment, such as a satellite phone
    • carry a topographic map, GPS and compass
    • carry a well-equipped first-aid kit and know how to use it
    • take enough drinking water
    • have good bush skills
    • undertake minimal impact practices

    Bushwalkers intending to bush camp, must book a camping permit.

    Horse and mountain bike riding

    Mountain bike riders explore the Joey trail. Photo: John Gatley.

    Mountain bike riders explore the Joey trail. Photo: John Gatley.

    Take time out from your ride to enjoy the scenery. Admire reflections in the waterhole along the Gregory River. Photo: John Gatley.

    Take time out from your ride to enjoy the scenery. Admire reflections in the waterhole along the Gregory River. Photo: John Gatley.

    A leisurely ride through the park on horseback or mountain bike is a great way to experience the wonders of the bush.

    There is a network of management roads and trails throughout the park that can be used for horse and mountain bike riding. A special permit is not required unless it is a commercial activity or an organised event and/or competitive event.

    Some trails have been specifically developed just for mountain bike riding. Horse riders are not permitted on the mountain bike trails.

    Horse and mountain-bike riding is fun provided you stay safe.

    Follow the give-way code: cyclists must give way to walkers and horseriders, and alert others when approaching them. Walkers must give way to horses.

    Read more information about horse riding and mountain bike riding in protected areas.

    Mountain bike trails (horses and trail bikes prohibited)

    In addition to riding on forest and management roads, the Promisedland mountain bike trail network provides dedicated trails for mountain biker riders. Most trails are suitable for intermediate riders with moderate fitness.

    These tracks vary in length and difficulty, crossing rocky gullies and showcasing the changing vegetation types from tall open forests to patches of vine scrub.

    The network of mountain bike trails at Promisedland is a project developed with Mountain Biking Bundaberg Incorporated. Volunteers from this group are working with the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service to provide and maintain trails for recreation.

    Some Promisedland mountain bike trails are designed to be ridden in a one-way direction, others allow two-way access. Check the direction of each trail on the map below before commencing your ride. Watch out for other trail users and wildlife.

    Walkers beware! These trails are purpose-built for mountain bike riding only. Walkers and runners who choose to use these trails do so at their own risk. The trails are narrow and rough in places. Bike riders may approach at speed from either direction—give way to them at all times.

    Map: Cordalba State Forest and mountain bike trails map (PDF, 200.9KB)

    Use the trail grade listed to choose rides suitable for your ability and fitness level.

    Trail classification
    ClassificationDescription
    Easy mountain bike trailEasy mountain bike trail: wide trail with gentle gradient and smooth surface. Some obstacles such as roots, logs and rocks. Suitable for beginner mountain bike riders with basic mountain bike skills and off-road bikes.
    Intermediate mountain bike trailIntermediate mountain bike trail: wide trail with gentle gradient and smooth surface. Some obstacles such as roots, logs and rocks. Suitable for beginner mountain bike riders with basic mountain bike skills and off-road bikes.
    Difficult mountain bike trailDifficult mountain bike trail: for experienced mountain bike riders. Challenging trail. Large, unavoidable obstacles and features. Long steep climbs or descents and loose surfaces.
    Mountain bike trails
    Trail detailsDistance Traffic flowClassification
    Trail 1
    Features: Joey trail for beginner riders
    800m return One-way: clockwise direction—refer to map Easy mountain bike trailEasy
    Trail 2
    Features: Grass tree trail, Start straight trail; and Dingo trail.
    Trail includes a short section along a management road.
    7.1km return Two-way Easy mountain bike trailEasy
    Trail 3
    Features: Cow bones link trail
    1.25km one way Two-way Easy mountain bike trailEasy
    Trail 4
    Features: Drifty bars trail.
    1.7km one way Two-way Easy mountain bike trailEasy
    Trail 5
    Features: Glider trail; Ironbark trial and Barking Owl trail.
    Trail includes sections along an unsealed road and a management road.
    6.7km return One-way and two-way sections—refer to map. Intermediate mountain bike trailIntermediate
    Trail 6
    Features: Beehive trail
    3km one way Two-way Intermediate mountain bike trailIntermediate
    Trail 7
    Features: Lost trail, Cluncker trail and Hoo koo e koo trail.
    Trail includes sections along an unsealed road and a management road.
    10.8km return Two-way Intermediate mountain bike trailIntermediate
    Trail 8
    Features: Cow bones trail
    3km one way Two-way with a one-way section—refer to map Difficult mountain bike trailDifficult
    Trail 9
    Features: Pin and Grin trail
    2km one way One-way—refer to map Difficult mountain bike trailDifficult

    Driving

    Drive carefully on forest roads. Travel at speeds appropriate for the road conditions. Photo: Cathy Gatley.

    Drive carefully on forest roads. Travel at speeds appropriate for the road conditions. Photo: Cathy Gatley.

    Go for a scenic drive through the forest. Generally the forest roads are recommended for four-wheel-drive vehicles only and are not suitable for caravans, two-wheel-drive campervans, mobile homes or conventional (on-road) camper trailers.

    The car parks for the Promisedland mountain bike trails are accessible by conventional vehicles.

    Be aware that forest roads beyond the Promisedland mountain bike trailhead car parks are suitable only for four-wheel-drive vehicles, as the road conditions can often vary, requiring high clearance vehicles with differential locking capabilities.

    • Vehicle access is not permitted in wet weather or where vehicle tracks sink into the road more than 2cm.
    • Only registered four-wheel-drive vehicles and trail bikes may be driven in Cordalba State Forest.
    • Drivers must be fully licensed.
    • Only drive on forest roads and formed management roads; others may be unsafe.
    • All Queensland road rules apply on forest and management roads.
    • The speed limit on forest roads is 50km/hr.

    Country gates have rules

    Remember, the rule is ‘leave the gate as you find it’ when passing through State forest or park gates:

    • If a gate is open, go through and leave it open.
    • If a gate is closed, open it, go through and close it.
    • If a gate is closed and locked, do not open it or barge through it—a locked gate means no access.

    Read more about driving safely and about four-wheel-driving in protected areas.

    • There are currently no park alerts for this park.