Coominglah State Forest Bundaberg

View over the valley of Three Moon Creek, from Hurdle Gully lookout. Photo: Beryl Bleys

Things to do

    Drivers of 4WD vehicles can continue past the lookout and drive through Hurdle Gully Scrub where magnificent bottle trees stand on the edge of the dry rainforest. Photo: Paul Grimshaw

    Drivers of 4WD vehicles can continue past the lookout and drive through Hurdle Gully Scrub where magnificent bottle trees stand on the edge of the dry rainforest. Photo: Paul Grimshaw

    Camping and accommodation

    Camping

    Camping is not permitted in Coominglah State Forest. Camping is available in Kalpowar State Forest, north of Monto and Tolderodden Conservation Park just west of Eidsvold.

    Also see: Parks of Monto and surrounds locality map (PDF, 372.5KB)  

    Other accommodation

    Hotel, motel, caravan, cabin and camping accommodation is available in Monto and near Lake Cania—close to the Cania Gorge National Park—and in Biloela. For more information, see the tourism information links below.

    Driving

    Coominglah State Forest has many roads and tracks once used to haul logs to local sawmills. Some of the tracks are maintained as fire control lines while others offer visitors a pleasant forest drive.

    The nature of the soils throughout Coominglah State Forest—weathered sandstones and clays—dictate road conditions in wet weather. Visitors who want to experience Coominglah’s forest drives should always check weather conditions before heading off.

    Warning! Do not attempt the steeper sections of the roads in wet weather. Even after a light shower of rain, some sections of the roads become extremely slippery and drivers will have difficulty maintaining vehicle traction on the road surface. Braking may be difficult and vehicles have slipped off the road to become stuck in soft, boggy patches on the road shoulders. Help can be hours away as mobile phone reception throughout the State forest area is very limited, and in places it is non-existent.

    Be prepared! Tell a responsible person about your plans for the drive and an expected return time so they can contact police to activate a search should something go wrong. Carry recovery gear and extra food and drinking water for the day.

    Road conditions vary

    Some sections of the road are reasonably flat and offer good driving surfaces. Other sections are steep and winding. The roads are recommended for four-wheel-drive vehicles only.

    Be aware that roads marked on the Coominglah State Forest map (PDF, 136.9KB) as 4WD are suitable only for four-wheel-drive vehicles requiring high clearance and vehicles with differential locking capabilitiesas the road conditions can often vary. Some roads are 4WD but less maintained than the others, and drivers may encounter obstacles such as fallen trees or deep wash-outs.

    Vehicle and trailer access

    The forest roads are not suitable for caravans, 2WD campervans, mobile homes or conventional (on-road) camper trailers. Clearance and slippery road conditions are the main issues to consider.

    Country gates have country rules:

    Leave the gates as you find them.

    • If a gate is open, drive through and leave it open
    • If a gate is closed, open it, drive through and close it behind you
    • If a gate is closed and locked, do not open it or barge through it—a locked gate means no access.

    Hurdle Gully drive

    A pleasant day’s outing and circuit drive in dry conditions. 4WD recommended

    Distance: 57km (sections 1 and 2)
    Time: allow 2hr for the circuit drive from Monto and return.

    Section 1—from Monto to Hurdle Gully lookout

    4WD recommended

    Distance: 29.3km one-way
    Time:
    allow 40min

    Take the Burnett Highway from Monto and head towards Biloela. After about 19km look for the sign to Hurdle Gully lookout and rest area. Turn left into the rest area. This is the last toilet facility on the drive. Head towards Hurdle Gully lookout along Kington Road. The road winds through sclerophyll forest, predominantly eucalypt and spotted gum Corymbia citriodora, with tall shrub and grass understorey. This forest was logged in the past, but some areas were retained as original forest.

    Take a break at the Hurdle Gully lookout—10.6km from the rest area—and enjoy the view into the valley of Three Moon Creek, across to the Mulgildie Plateau and further to the catchment of the Burnett River. The lookout has a small interpretive display, picnic tables and parking area. There is no water or toilet at this site or anywhere else along the drive.

    Return to Monto back along the same route. In dry conditions, drivers of four-wheel-drive vehicles can continue the loop via Hurdle Gully Scrub.

    Before visiting, download and print off the Coominglah State Forest map (PDF, 136.9KB) and have it in the car travelling through Coominglah.

    Section 2—from Hurdle Gully lookout to Monto via Hurdle Gully Road

    Accessible in dry weather only—4WD only

    Distance: 27km one-way
    Time: allow 45min

    If conditions are dry, continue driving south-west along Davies Road onto Scrubby Road and left into Hurdle Gully Road. Sections along this part of the road are steep and in wet weather can be hazardous. The road winds through Hurdle Gully Scrub—one of the last remaining patches of dry rainforest of its type in Queensland and perhaps the world—and continues to the State forest boundary and on to Airport Drive. Turn left at the T-intersection to continue along Airport Road—a sealed country road—to Monto.

    To get back to the Mulgildie–Monto Road, turn right at the T-intersection of Hurdle Gully Road and Airport Road, then turn left into the unsealed Evans Road.

    Please refer to the Coominglah State Forest map (PDF, 136.9KB)  for more details.

    Coominglah to Cania drive including Hurdle Gully lookout

    4WD recommended

    Distance: 32km (Sections 1 and 2)
    Time: allow 1hr

    Section 1—from Monto to Hurdle Gully lookout

    4WD recommended

    Distance: 29.3km one-way
    Time: allow 40min.

    Take the Burnett Highway from Monto and head towards Biloela. After about 19km look for the sign to Hurdle Gully lookout and rest area. Turn left into the rest area. This is the last toilet facility on the drive. Head towards Hurdle Gully lookout along Kington Road. The road winds through sclerophyll forest, predominantly eucalypt and spotted gum Corymbia citriodora, with tall shrub and grass understorey. This forest was logged in the past, but some areas were retained as original forest.

    Take a break at the Hurdle Gully lookout—10.6km from the rest area—and enjoy the view into the valley of Three Moon Creek, across to the Mulgildie Plateau and further to the catchment of the Burnett River. The lookout has a small interpretive display, picnic tables and parking area. There is no water or toilet at this site or anywhere else along the drive.

    Before visiting, download and print off the Coominglah State Forest map (PDF, 136.9KB) and have it in the car travelling through Coominglah.

    Section 2—from Hurdle Gully lookout to Cania Gorge National Park

    Distance: 32km
    Time: allow 1hr

    From the lookout, backtrack along Kington Road and turn left into Roths Road, which runs onto the short Main Camp Road and then veers right onto Mount Margaret Road and ends at the Burnett Highway. Drive across the highway onto Cedar Creek Road, drive on for 13km, then turn left onto Cania Road. After 7.4km stop and take a rest at the Cania Gorge National Park day-use facilities—picnic tables, toilets, electric barbecue and interpretation display.

    This is the starting point for most of the park’s walking tracks through and around the top of the gorge, with long and short walks offering visitors a selection of walking experiences. Drive on through beautiful rural landscapes and views of the gorge escarpments to Lake Cania (11km), the area's water supply.

    Facilities include a boat ramp, toilets, kiosk, picnic areas and two privately-run camping and caravan parks nearby. Canoeing, water skiing and fishing is permitted on Lake Cania.

    Return to Monto by driving back along Cania Road, passing through the village of Moonford, back onto the Burnett Highway and head south-east to Monto.

    Picnic and day-use areas

    Picnic facilities are available at Hurdle Gully lookout, 10.6km off the Burnett Highway. There are no water or toilet facilities at the lookout. The only toilet is at the rest area, 19km from Monto, just off the Burnett Highway.

    Other things to do

    Enjoy Coominglah. Most visitors drive through Coominglah State Forest in four-wheel-drive vehicles. However, bicycles, trail bikes and horses can also be ridden on Coominglah State Forest roads.

    Viewing wildlife

    Coominglah State Forest supports about 650 plants and 440 animals. The Hurdle Gully Scrub—an extreme form of dry seasonal subtropical rainforest—supports 18 known threatened species.

    Glossy black-cockatoos—an uncommon species—feed almost exclusively on allocasuarina seeds. Their strong beaks mangle the seed pod to get at the small seed inside. The mangled orts—remains of the seed pods—are discarded. Seeing these under trees gives a clue to the birds’ presence in the forest.

    At night, yellow-bellied gliders come out to feed. They are big, noisy and gregarious and are often seen in spotted gums or other smooth-barked eucalypts. Tiny wildlife, such as the golden-tailed gecko Strophurus taenicauda, feed on a variety of insects hunted out from under bark and leaf litter.

    Watch for eastern grey kangaroos in the grassy understorey and at the lookout. The area also offers good bird watching opportunities. Wedge-tailed eagles can often be seen soaring high over the canopy. Many different species of butterflies have been sighted in the Hurdle Gully area, and at night micro bats take flight to hunt for small insects.

    • There are currently no park alerts for this park.