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About Coalstoun Lakes

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Getting there and getting around

Access track into Coalstoun Lakes National Park looking back to Isis Highway. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Access track into Coalstoun Lakes National Park looking back to Isis Highway. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Turn off the Isis Highway 20km south of Biggenden or 4km north of the township of Coalstoun Lakes into Crater Lakes Road. Follow the vehicle access track, approximately 1km, through a grassy paddock to the beginning of the walk up the northern crater. A car park is provided at the end of the road.

Park features

The park is an area of remarkable geological interest. It is the site of a volcano that erupted more than 600,000 years ago, yet it is still one of the youngest volcanic formations in Australia. Evidence of the basalt lava that flowed out from the craters is still present, in the form of the large basalt rocks along the walking track. This is known as Baranbah Basalt. The lakes were named by Wade Brun, manager of nearby Ban Ban Station, in 1894 after an ancestral home in Scotland.

This is a park ideal for walking, birdwatching and nature study.

Camping and accommodation

Camping is not permitted in Coalstoun Lakes National Park.

Other accommodation

Accommodation is available in and around the township of Biggenden, 20km to the north, or in Gayndah which is 45km west of Coalstoun Lakes National Park.

For further information see tourism information links.

Things to do

Follow the track to a great view of the crater below. Photo: Sophia Levy, Queensland Government.

Follow the track to a great view of the crater below. Photo: Sophia Levy, Queensland Government.

View of the surrounding farmland with Mount Walla in the distance. Photo: Sophia Levy, Queensland Government.

View of the surrounding farmland with Mount Walla in the distance. Photo: Sophia Levy, Queensland Government.

The bird hides are nestled amongst flowering Melaleuca bracteata in late Spring. Photo: Sophia Levy, Queensland Government.

The bird hides are nestled amongst flowering Melaleuca bracteata in late Spring. Photo: Sophia Levy, Queensland Government.

Watch the antics of the gregarious double-barred finches as they dart to the ground to forage for seeds. Photo: Graham Winterflood, copyright Creative Commons.

Watch the antics of the gregarious double-barred finches as they dart to the ground to forage for seeds. Photo: Graham Winterflood, copyright Creative Commons.

Walking

Take binoculars, wear a hat, sunscreen and protective clothing to avoid being scratched by prickly shrubs in the vine thicket.

Coalstoun Lakes walking track

class 4 walking track icon Grade 4 track: Bushwalking experience recommended. Tracks may be long, rough and very steep.

Distance: 4.4km return (one-way distances to features—first viewpoint: 500m; first bird hide: 800m; second bird hide: 2.2km)
Time: allow 2–3hrs

Details: Walk up the northern side of the crater to the crater rim for stunning views of the first crater lake, surrounding rural landscape and Mount Walsh National Park.

Descend to the first shallow lake and bird hide, then continue around the edge of the lake through dry rainforest, over a ridge with landscape views, and down to the second crater lake and bird hide.

The lakes are fringed by black tea tree Melaleuca bracteata and in dry periods sedgeland plants thrive in the empty lake beds.

The dry rainforest here is one of only a few remaining examples in this region. Bottle trees, crows ash and leopard ash trees protrude above a dense understorey. The three-leaved Bosistoa transversa growing here is vulnerable to extinction.

Viewing wildlife

Coalstoun Lakes offers excellent opportunities for viewing wildlife. Enjoy spending time at the bird hides observing wildlife around the lakes and in the dry rainforest canopy. The two bird hides along the track are most useful when the lakes are full after heavy rain, and water birds flock to the two crater lakes.

White-faced heron, rose-crowned fruit-dove and double-barred finches can all be seen because of the range of habitats within the small area in and around the lakes. During dryer periods, water birds are replaced by wedge-tailed eagles and swamp harriers that can be seen searching for prey on the dry lake bed.

Things to know before you go

  • Wear sunscreen, a hat and protective clothing to avoid being scratched by prickly shrubs in the vine thicket.
  • Bring adequate food and drinking water.
  • Bring binoculars for viewing wildlife.

Pets

Domestic animals are not permitted in Coalstoun Lakes National Park.

Climate and weather

Coalstoun Lakes and Biggenden area enjoys a mild, subtropical climate. The average daily temperature range is 20°C to 33°C in summer and 7°C to 24°C in winter.

For more information see the tourism information links.

Staying safe

  • Plan ahead—let a responsible person know of your itinerary, and emergency plan if things go wrong.
  • Carry enough drinking water, food, first-aid kit and mobile phone.
  • Never walk alone—if something happens to you someone in your group can go for help.
  • Protect yourself from the sun—wear adequate sunscreen and insect repellent.
  • When the lakes contain water, the water is shallow and sometimes stagnant. For you safety stay out of the water.
  • Do not leave valuables unattended.

For more information, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

Looking after the park

You can help protect the park by following these guidelines.

  • Do not feed or leave food for animals. Human food can harm wildlife and cause some animals to become aggressive.
  • Everything within the park is protected. Do not take or interfere with plants or animals.
  • Take your rubbish out of the park for appropriate disposal.
  • Stay on tracks. Do not cut corners or create new tracks, as this causes erosion.

See the guidelines on caring for parks for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks.

Park management

Coalstoun Lakes National Park is 26.3ha and was first gazetted in 1994 as a national park. The Department of Environment and Science manages Coalstoun Lakes National Park under the Nature Conservation Act 1992 to preserve and protect its natural and cultural values in perpetuity.

Tourism information links

Bundaberg Information Centre

bundabergregion.info

36 Avenue Street, Bundaberg
PO Box 930, Bundaberg QLD 4670
ph (07) 4153 8888
fax (07) 4151 2527
email

Visit Fraser Coast information centres

visitfrasercoast.com
email
Fraser Coast Tourism and Events manages accredited Visitor Information Centres in the Fraser Coast area that provide a range of local and regional tourist brochures and information, as well as a tour, attraction and accommodation booking service.

  • Hervey Bay Visitor Information Centre, 227 Maryborough-Hervey Bay Rd, Hervey Bay, Qld 4655
  • Maryborough Information Centre, Maryborough City Hall, 388 Kent St, Maryborough Qld 4650
  • Tiaro Information Centre, Mayne St, Tiaro Qld 4650
  • Hervey Bay Airport, Don Adams Drive, Hervey Bay Qld 4655

Gayndah Museum and Information Centre
gayndahmuseum.com.au

Queensland Holidays

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland see Queensland Holidays.

Further information

Contact us

Last updated
20 November 2019