Auburn River National Park Bundaberg

Photo credit: Photo: Michael Piper © Qld Govt

Things to do

    The Riverbed and Rock Pools Walk is a rough track that winds down the gorge to the river. Photo: Ross Naumann, Queensland Government volunteer.

    The Riverbed and Rock Pools Walk is a rough track that winds down the gorge to the river. Photo: Ross Naumann, Queensland Government volunteer.

    Bottle trees feature in Auburn River's dry vine thicket. Photo: Robert Ashdown, Queensland Government.

    Bottle trees feature in Auburn River's dry vine thicket. Photo: Robert Ashdown, Queensland Government.

    Bottle trees, growing beside the walking tracks, have distinctively shaped leaves and seed pods. Photo: Robert Ashdown, Queensland Government.

    Bottle trees, growing beside the walking tracks, have distinctively shaped leaves and seed pods. Photo: Robert Ashdown, Queensland Government.

    View of Auburn River from the Gorge Lookout Walk. Photo: Ross Naumann, Queensland Government volunteer.

    View of Auburn River from the Gorge Lookout Walk. Photo: Ross Naumann, Queensland Government volunteer.

    Sun-loving rainbow skinks are the most common reptile seen around Auburn River. Photo: Robert Ashdown, Queensland Government.

    Sun-loving rainbow skinks are the most common reptile seen around Auburn River. Photo: Robert Ashdown, Queensland Government.

    Camping and accommodation

    A basic camping area is provided on the northern side of the Auburn River.

    Camping permits are required and fees apply.

    Other accommodation

    There is a range of holiday accommodation in and around Mundubbera. For more information see the tourism information links below.

    Walking

    There are three walks that begin from the day-use and camping area. Stay on track to avoid getting lost in this area and carry enough drinking water.

    Allow 15–20 minutes to walk one kilometre. This time is calculated for people of average fitness, with bushwalking experience and ankle-supporting footwear. If you are walking with young children or are an inexperienced bushwalker allow more time to include rests and to return to your starting point.

    Key to track standards

    Each walking track is classified according to its most difficult section, other sections may be easier. Use the walking track grade listed with each track description to choose walks suitable for your group.

    Grade 3 track:

    • defined, rough track; may have some short steep sections and many steps
    • no formed creek crossings; cliff edges and lookouts generally not fenced; appropriate caution required
    • extra caution needed on decomposed granite
    • some experience recommended; suitable for most ages and fitness levels.

    Grade 4 track:

    • tracks may be long, rough and very steep
    • caution is needed at creek crossings, on cliff edges and naturally occurring lookouts
    • directional signs may be limited
    • bushwalking experience recommended.

    Walking tracks

    Gorge Lookout Walk (Grade 3)

    Distance: 600m return

    Time: allow 15mins

    Details: The short track leaves from the end of the car park and continues to impressive views across the Auburn River gorge. Views of the river and its distinctive boulders are ready to be captured on camera. The ‘Giant’s Chair’ can be seen from the lookout; so too is a peregrine falcon's nest—easily detected because of the telltale signs of ‘white-wash’ marks on the cliff face below a collection of sticks and debris which make up the nest.

    The lookout is not fenced—stay well back from the edge and supervise children at all times.

    Riverbed and Rock Pools Walk (Grade 4)

    Distance: 1.5km return

    Time: allow 1hr

    Details: This is a strenuous walk and should only be attempted by fit walkers. Leaving the day-use and camping area, this rough track winds down the side of the gorge to the river, travelling through dry rainforest, eucalypt forest and creek vegetation. The swollen trunks of the dominant bottle trees can be seen. At the river, take time to observe the immediate area to ensure you will be able to find the trail on your return. Take care when walking on wet rock surfaces, as they can be slippery. Supervise children closely.

    Gorge Top Walk (Grade 3)

    Distance: 3.2km return

    Time: allow 1hr 30mins

    Details: The track follows the river on a gentle walk through open eucalypt forest along the top of the gorge. At the lookout there are spectacular views down the river, which flows over a series of cascades to the Auburn River Falls—best seen after heavy rain.

    Picnic and day-use areas

    The picnic area is located in a picturesque bush setting on the northern bank of the Auburn River. Picnic tables, toilets and a gas barbecue are provided. Bring your own drinking water. River water is unsuitable for drinking. No bins are provided; visitors are asked to take their rubbish with them.

    Viewing wildlife

    Use binoculars to go birdwatching in the forests along the cliff tops or the riverbanks. Look for peregrine falcons nesting in cliffs opposite the camping area. Brush-tailed rock wallabies are found around the cliffs and red-necked wallabies in scrubby gullies near the camping area. Wildflowers bloom in spring. The river is teeming with interesting aquatic life.

    See the description of the park’s natural environment for more details about Auburn River's diverse wildlife.

    • There are currently no park alerts for this park.